Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820


 

The NGS Monthly rarely mentions new books, but made an exception in October 2022 for "Paul Heinegg and the research he’s conducted over more than two decades, culminating in the recent publication of his sixth edition of the three-volume set, Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820."

What stands out is that while you can buy the book, FREE AFRICAN AMERICANS OF THE COLONIAL SOUTHEAST, or consult his website - for free! http://www.freeafricanamericans.com

Paul Heinegg, Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820 in Three Volumes, 6th edition, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2021), v.

Valorie

--
https://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her


Kathryn Schultz
 

Valorie, I had overlooked your post about this earlier this month.
Paul Heinegg’s web site is great, and I found a lot of information 
on Edward Mozingo, who married my Bayly ancestor’s sister 
Margaret in Old Rappahanock Co., Virginia before 1685.

Kathryn Schultz


On Thu, Nov 3, 2022 at 12:02 AM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:
The NGS Monthly rarely mentions new books, but made an exception in October 2022 for "Paul Heinegg and the research he’s conducted over more than two decades, culminating in the recent publication of his sixth edition of the three-volume set, Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820."

What stands out is that while you can buy the book, FREE AFRICAN AMERICANS OF THE COLONIAL SOUTHEAST, or consult his website - for free! http://www.freeafricanamericans.com

Paul Heinegg, Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820 in Three Volumes, 6th edition, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2021), v.


Valorie

--
https://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her


L Boyet
 

Following many records other than census; one can find many early (1600 – 1800) descriptions evolve from Negro/Free Negro/F.N. to Mullato to swartly to white. Swartly meant dark complexion, for example “swartly Irish”.

FYI – Abraham Lincoln – Father was a “swartly German, his mother was Melungeon.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathryn Schultz
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2022 7:35 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820

 

Valorie, I had overlooked your post about this earlier this month.

Paul Heinegg’s web site is great, and I found a lot of information 

on Edward Mozingo, who married my Bayly ancestor’s sister 

Margaret in Old Rappahanock Co., Virginia before 1685.

 

Kathryn Schultz

 

 

On Thu, Nov 3, 2022 at 12:02 AM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:

The NGS Monthly rarely mentions new books, but made an exception in October 2022 for "Paul Heinegg and the research he’s conducted over more than two decades, culminating in the recent publication of his sixth edition of the three-volume set, Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820."

 

What stands out is that while you can buy the book, FREE AFRICAN AMERICANS OF THE COLONIAL SOUTHEAST, or consult his website - for free! http://www.freeafricanamericans.com

 

Paul Heinegg, Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820 in Three Volumes, 6th edition, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2021), v.

 

 

Valorie

 

--

https://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her

 


L Boyet
 

I also suggest a look into the Moor presence in the early Colony areas. A good reference book is “Jews and Muslims in British Colonial America”.

Also studies in the North American Indian History. I recommend the book: “A New Order Of Things: Property, Power, and the Transformation of the Creek Indians” (1735-1816).

Arab-Moors were often considered and confused as Black, etc.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathryn Schultz
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2022 7:35 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820

 

Valorie, I had overlooked your post about this earlier this month.

Paul Heinegg’s web site is great, and I found a lot of information 

on Edward Mozingo, who married my Bayly ancestor’s sister 

Margaret in Old Rappahanock Co., Virginia before 1685.

 

Kathryn Schultz

 

 

On Thu, Nov 3, 2022 at 12:02 AM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:

The NGS Monthly rarely mentions new books, but made an exception in October 2022 for "Paul Heinegg and the research he’s conducted over more than two decades, culminating in the recent publication of his sixth edition of the three-volume set, Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820."

 

What stands out is that while you can buy the book, FREE AFRICAN AMERICANS OF THE COLONIAL SOUTHEAST, or consult his website - for free! http://www.freeafricanamericans.com

 

Paul Heinegg, Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820 in Three Volumes, 6th edition, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2021), v.

 

 

Valorie

 

--

https://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her

 


L Boyet
 

Correction – swarthy, not swarthly

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: L Boyet
Sent: Monday, November 28, 2022 6:05 AM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: RE: [SKCGS] Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820

 

Following many records other than census; one can find many early (1600 – 1800) descriptions evolve from Negro/Free Negro/F.N. to Mullato to swartly to white. Swartly meant dark complexion, for example “swartly Irish”.

FYI – Abraham Lincoln – Father was a “swartly German, his mother was Melungeon.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows

 

From: Kathryn Schultz
Sent: Sunday, November 27, 2022 7:35 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820

 

Valorie, I had overlooked your post about this earlier this month.

Paul Heinegg’s web site is great, and I found a lot of information 

on Edward Mozingo, who married my Bayly ancestor’s sister 

Margaret in Old Rappahanock Co., Virginia before 1685.

 

Kathryn Schultz

 

 

On Thu, Nov 3, 2022 at 12:02 AM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:

The NGS Monthly rarely mentions new books, but made an exception in October 2022 for "Paul Heinegg and the research he’s conducted over more than two decades, culminating in the recent publication of his sixth edition of the three-volume set, Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820."

 

What stands out is that while you can buy the book, FREE AFRICAN AMERICANS OF THE COLONIAL SOUTHEAST, or consult his website - for free! http://www.freeafricanamericans.com

 

Paul Heinegg, Free African Americans of North Carolina, Virginia, and South Carolina, from the Colonial Period to about 1820 in Three Volumes, 6th edition, (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2021), v.

 

 

Valorie

 

--

https://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her