2022 January 24 Genealogy Chat


 

2022 January 24 Genealogy Chat

20 Attended; 15 Members: Valorie Cowan Zimmerman, Rebecca Dare, Melanie Hinds, Robert Marvin, Winona Laird, Ileen Peterson, Alexis Hacker Scholz, Kathryn Schultz, MaryLynn Strickland, Annette Gathright, Margi, David Hutchinson, Cheri Sayer, T Briggs, Nadine Guilbault, and 5 guests: Karen Harrison, Kevin Schilt, JoAnn Lawrence, Bev Cato, Sandra Wilson Alto.

Welcome! This genealogy chat is brought to you by the South King County Genealogical Society. We'd love to have you as a Member: http://skcgs.org/membership.html

Today's blog: https://skcgs.blogspot.com/2022/01/voila-finding-context-for-your-research.html. Kevin Schilt: "That is cool."

Kevin Schilt, commenting on JoAnn's lovely tatted image: "Joann that is beautiful!"

Cheri Sayer: "Hi!  I'm in Palm Springs and just returned to my room for lunch and saw the email reminder." 

Kathryn Schultz told us about a recent connection she made: "Dr. Benes’s brother was an English professor at my college, Southwestern at Memphis, now Rhodes College."

Sandra Wilson Alto: "Might have to just listen as there is a loud shredder going in my neighbors garden!" Thank you Sandra! We all appreciate fellow online meeting participants who remember to mute while not speaking.

We discussed the power of uploading both a gedcom and DNA to MyHeritage. The size of the tree you can maintain there is limited to 1000 unless you pay for a subscription. Even that is very useful if you have more recent European ancestors. 

Another place to upload a full tree & DNA is Geneanet. Sandra Wilson Alto: "What about Geneanet for European trees. I have found my husband's Finnish side." 

And don't forget Geni, an older site that many Europeans have used. You can link there to a FamilyTreeDNA DNA kit, another reason to upload to FamilyTreeDNA! Don't forget to upload the gedcom there too -- while clunky, if you link your matches to your tree, it can be very powerful as the system will auto-sort your matches. Can anyone think of another site that has been useful to you where you can have both a tree and DNA? 

I certainly advocate for Wikitree although I suggest *not* uploading more than a tiny gedcom, and like Geni, you only link to your DNA, not upload it. One cool feature is that *all* DNA can be linked to, no matter where you have it. 

VZ: "I define "completionist" as finding and linking every single record for every single person in the family -- including all spouses, step-children, etc. -- the whole FAN club. I find it useful especially on FamilySearch Family Tree, because the sources and citations are so conveniently arranged. I do that intensively before creating WikiTree profiles so I can paste in all those citations before building the biography.

Valorie Cowan Zimmerman: "Hey Tom! welcome. Long time no see! How are you?" T Briggs: Hi Valorie and group, I am doing fine just can't seem to find time for meeting and Genealogy. Still caregiving and learning to cook and clean house :)😲: VZ: "So good to see you Tom. {{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{hugs}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}"

Alexis Hacker Scholz: "Hi, Kevin. Glad to see you." Kevin Schilt: "Good to see you AH."

For Ileen: "There is a group in Seattle for Swedish Finns called the Swedish Finn Historical Society: http://swedishfinnhistoricalsociety.org        
    phone:  206-706-0738 email:  info@...
~~Meets annually, 2nd Sat. in March at the Swedish Club, 1920 Dexter Ave. North, Seattle, WA.  Meetings are open to members and invited guests.
The Swedish Finn Historical Society is a WA Non-Profit Corp., associated with the Swedish Club.  They maintain a genealogical resource library and provide research services.  Hours are:  Mondays, 9am-12:30pm; Wednesdays, 2pm-5pm; Thursdays, 9am-12:30pm and the 1st Sunday of the month, 10am-2pm.  Online databases are available on the website for members.  Special Collections include; DEE Database (Document Every Emigrant) with over 38,000 entries, digitalized "Leading Star" newspapers, Order of Runeberg Lodge records, 14,000 Obits of Swedish Finn immigrants, Emmaus Lutheran Church records and a photo database with names." All this from the Washington State Genealogical Society page with all the known gen societies in the state: https://www.wasgs.org/cpage.php?pt=86

The name of the book Kevin mentioned: Slaves, Salt, Sex & Mr. Crenshaw: The Real Story of the Old Slave House and America's Reverse Underground R.R. On Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Slaves-Salt-Sex-Mr-Crenshaw/dp/0970798458/

Kevin Schilt: "Valerie, you might want to contact Lyles Station Indiana Museum. It is a rural community with an African American Museum. One of the few rural African American communities left. https://www.facebook.com/LylesStation/ and website: http://www.lylesstation.org/." VZ: "Thanks! I imagine the US Black Heritage project on Wikitree would like that link."

VZ: "There are lots of reasons people want to leave - sometimes the small everyday indignities that Black folks had to endure made them want to move to a fresh place where maybe they would find something closer to dignity and equality."

Join if you would like to help with the research of the Black miners in Franklin: https://skcgs.groups.io/g/Black-Heritage-Franklin

Cheri Sayer: "I'm having trouble with my computer cord and battery and the laptop is running out of juice. Can't seem to get it to charge, so I'll have to go soon." VZ: Glad you could make it today, Cheri. I'm sorry to hear of your laptop problems. I hope you can replace that battery." Ileen Peterson: "Get a HALO to support/recharge laptop or other devices-including automobiles!! My favorite Xmas gift!"

Kevin Schilt: "Sorry, have to go. Always enjoy this."

While discussing the Nordic annual household survey records, which were taken and kept by the church, which in effect was the government before modern times, I said, "The Swedish household records are wonderful. Not all are available but so many are, some back to the 1600s. Another resource for European trees and records is Geni. I find loads of stuff by Googling for it in Geni. And don't forget to check Find a Grave, Interment.net and BillionGraves. There may be other sites in each country as well.

JoAnn Lawrence: "Great chat, thank you. It's dinner time here on the East Coast. Stay safe and healthy." Thanks for joining in today, JoAnn. Hope to see you again.

While discussing the beginning of the Great Migration of Black folks from the Old South to the north and west for jobs, MaryLynn talked a bit about the Exodusters moving from the South to the mid-West to farm on free land in the 1870s. Some of those people ended up moving to Liberia, part of the Back to Africa movement. Most did not, of course. https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/exodusters.htm and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exodusters

VZ: "Hi Nadine!: Nadine Guilbault: "Sorry for being late, I was busy working on an article. Oops." No excuses needed. We're happy to see you here.

Re: slavery in Canada -- even where there was *not* slavery, there was - in some places - prejudice and other problems. One book showing what descendants of slave holders can do: Slaves in the Family by Edward Ball.

In a question from Kathryn Schultz looking for information about Edward Mozingo: Here is one interview: https://www.wbur.org/npr/165512010/a-white-face-with-a-forgotten-african-family. "Ric Murphy has in his book _Arrival of the First Africans in Virginia_ as in his lectures he includes Edward Mozingo in his list of the 32 Angolans brought to Point Comfort in 1619." VZ: "I've heard Ric Murphy speak to NGS about these first Black people imported 400 years ago, and what happened after. Melanie Hinds: List of Finding Your Roots Episodes:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Finding_Your_Roots_episodes

Robert Marvin: "I apologize for being quietly listening but I have been waiting for a phone call that just came in, so I can now type this message. Love the discussions and information." No need to apologize, there is no duty to speak! It's nice to see you here, Robert.

VZ: "by the way, you can upload your tree to American Ancestors - and your DNA! It took me a while to get it working, but it's possible -- and free. Nadine Guilbault: "UPLOAD to American Ancestors tree and DNA?? I did not know that. Any cost?" Completely free! Of course they want you to join, but all you need is a free account. American AncesTREES: upload both a gedcom and DNA. https://www.familytreemagazine.com/websites/4-reasons-american-ancestrees/
American AncesTREES is a terrible name in my opinion but the site was designed by Dallan Quass who used to head up FamilySearch and created Rootsfinder.

Someone mentioned keeping track of all the sites where one uploads a gedcom and DNA. We have one you can copy; if you prefer to keep it in a spreadsheet that is also efficient. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lCeespvlGumqC0Vom3XZDlzQulntE3Sk3pSUTFGbB8E/edit?usp=sharing If you upload for more than one person, and keep it on a spreadsheet, perhaps keep each person on a different tab. 

Nadine had asked how to find all our blogs: http://skcgs.org/blog.html. Nadine Guilbault: "Thanks, I will check it out." You can subscribe on the SKCGS website. David Hutchinson: https://skcgs.blogspot.com/ - where the blog actually resides. Send your blog contribution to m.strickland@....

Nadine Guilbault: "Thanks, have a good evening."

What a great chat! What did I forget or get wrong?

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her


rebecca dare
 

Sorry I had to leave early yesterday. Great recounting of what I missed, as usual - thanks Valorie!

I'm glad you mentioned RootsFinder - I once did some wonderful "reports" of the locations all my ancestors in each state they were in. I checked into RootsFinder and saw that Dallan will be launching a "Google" just for genealogy sometime this year. You can sign up for a free year, no credit card, etc. that will go into effect when it starts. Here's wrote he wrote: 

"Google tries to be comprehensive but the web is immense. They can’t index everything so they limit how many pages they index from each site. That means you’re missing thousands of possible results when you use google to search the web for genealogy.

OurRoots is a new genealogy-specific search engine that will index (almost) all genealogy on the web. It will launch [in 2022].

I’m the author of RootsFinder.com. I’m currently looking for early users and hope you are interested. Everyone who signs up now will receive a free Pro subscription when we launch.

If you are interested, click on the link below

www.ourroots.com




Dallan

On Monday, January 24, 2022, 09:36:51 PM PST, Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:


2022 January 24 Genealogy Chat

20 Attended; 15 Members: Valorie Cowan Zimmerman, Rebecca Dare, Melanie Hinds, Robert Marvin, Winona Laird, Ileen Peterson, Alexis Hacker Scholz, Kathryn Schultz, MaryLynn Strickland, Annette Gathright, Margi, David Hutchinson, Cheri Sayer, T Briggs, Nadine Guilbault, and 5 guests: Karen Harrison, Kevin Schilt, JoAnn Lawrence, Bev Cato, Sandra Wilson Alto.

Welcome! This genealogy chat is brought to you by the South King County Genealogical Society. We'd love to have you as a Member: http://skcgs.org/membership.html

Today's blog: https://skcgs.blogspot.com/2022/01/voila-finding-context-for-your-research.html. Kevin Schilt: "That is cool."

Kevin Schilt, commenting on JoAnn's lovely tatted image: "Joann that is beautiful!"

Cheri Sayer: "Hi!  I'm in Palm Springs and just returned to my room for lunch and saw the email reminder." 

Kathryn Schultz told us about a recent connection she made: "Dr. Benes’s brother was an English professor at my college, Southwestern at Memphis, now Rhodes College."

Sandra Wilson Alto: "Might have to just listen as there is a loud shredder going in my neighbors garden!" Thank you Sandra! We all appreciate fellow online meeting participants who remember to mute while not speaking.

We discussed the power of uploading both a gedcom and DNA to MyHeritage. The size of the tree you can maintain there is limited to 1000 unless you pay for a subscription. Even that is very useful if you have more recent European ancestors. 

Another place to upload a full tree & DNA is Geneanet. Sandra Wilson Alto: "What about Geneanet for European trees. I have found my husband's Finnish side." 

And don't forget Geni, an older site that many Europeans have used. You can link there to a FamilyTreeDNA DNA kit, another reason to upload to FamilyTreeDNA! Don't forget to upload the gedcom there too -- while clunky, if you link your matches to your tree, it can be very powerful as the system will auto-sort your matches. Can anyone think of another site that has been useful to you where you can have both a tree and DNA? 

I certainly advocate for Wikitree although I suggest *not* uploading more than a tiny gedcom, and like Geni, you only link to your DNA, not upload it. One cool feature is that *all* DNA can be linked to, no matter where you have it. 

VZ: "I define "completionist" as finding and linking every single record for every single person in the family -- including all spouses, step-children, etc. -- the whole FAN club. I find it useful especially on FamilySearch Family Tree, because the sources and citations are so conveniently arranged. I do that intensively before creating WikiTree profiles so I can paste in all those citations before building the biography.

Valorie Cowan Zimmerman: "Hey Tom! welcome. Long time no see! How are you?" T Briggs: Hi Valorie and group, I am doing fine just can't seem to find time for meeting and Genealogy. Still caregiving and learning to cook and clean house :)😲: VZ: "So good to see you Tom. {{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{hugs}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}"

Alexis Hacker Scholz: "Hi, Kevin. Glad to see you." Kevin Schilt: "Good to see you AH."

For Ileen: "There is a group in Seattle for Swedish Finns called the Swedish Finn Historical Society: http://swedishfinnhistoricalsociety.org        
    phone:  206-706-0738 email:  info@...
~~Meets annually, 2nd Sat. in March at the Swedish Club, 1920 Dexter Ave. North, Seattle, WA.  Meetings are open to members and invited guests.
The Swedish Finn Historical Society is a WA Non-Profit Corp., associated with the Swedish Club.  They maintain a genealogical resource library and provide research services.  Hours are:  Mondays, 9am-12:30pm; Wednesdays, 2pm-5pm; Thursdays, 9am-12:30pm and the 1st Sunday of the month, 10am-2pm.  Online databases are available on the website for members.  Special Collections include; DEE Database (Document Every Emigrant) with over 38,000 entries, digitalized "Leading Star" newspapers, Order of Runeberg Lodge records, 14,000 Obits of Swedish Finn immigrants, Emmaus Lutheran Church records and a photo database with names." All this from the Washington State Genealogical Society page with all the known gen societies in the state: https://www.wasgs.org/cpage.php?pt=86

The name of the book Kevin mentioned: Slaves, Salt, Sex & Mr. Crenshaw: The Real Story of the Old Slave House and America's Reverse Underground R.R. On Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Slaves-Salt-Sex-Mr-Crenshaw/dp/0970798458/

Kevin Schilt: "Valerie, you might want to contact Lyles Station Indiana Museum. It is a rural community with an African American Museum. One of the few rural African American communities left. https://www.facebook.com/LylesStation/ and website: http://www.lylesstation.org/." VZ: "Thanks! I imagine the US Black Heritage project on Wikitree would like that link."

VZ: "There are lots of reasons people want to leave - sometimes the small everyday indignities that Black folks had to endure made them want to move to a fresh place where maybe they would find something closer to dignity and equality."

Join if you would like to help with the research of the Black miners in Franklin: https://skcgs.groups.io/g/Black-Heritage-Franklin

Cheri Sayer: "I'm having trouble with my computer cord and battery and the laptop is running out of juice. Can't seem to get it to charge, so I'll have to go soon." VZ: Glad you could make it today, Cheri. I'm sorry to hear of your laptop problems. I hope you can replace that battery." Ileen Peterson: "Get a HALO to support/recharge laptop or other devices-including automobiles!! My favorite Xmas gift!"

Kevin Schilt: "Sorry, have to go. Always enjoy this."

While discussing the Nordic annual household survey records, which were taken and kept by the church, which in effect was the government before modern times, I said, "The Swedish household records are wonderful. Not all are available but so many are, some back to the 1600s. Another resource for European trees and records is Geni. I find loads of stuff by Googling for it in Geni. And don't forget to check Find a Grave, Interment.net and BillionGraves. There may be other sites in each country as well.

JoAnn Lawrence: "Great chat, thank you. It's dinner time here on the East Coast. Stay safe and healthy." Thanks for joining in today, JoAnn. Hope to see you again.

While discussing the beginning of the Great Migration of Black folks from the Old South to the north and west for jobs, MaryLynn talked a bit about the Exodusters moving from the South to the mid-West to farm on free land in the 1870s. Some of those people ended up moving to Liberia, part of the Back to Africa movement. Most did not, of course. https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/exodusters.htm and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exodusters

VZ: "Hi Nadine!: Nadine Guilbault: "Sorry for being late, I was busy working on an article. Oops." No excuses needed. We're happy to see you here.

Re: slavery in Canada -- even where there was *not* slavery, there was - in some places - prejudice and other problems. One book showing what descendants of slave holders can do: Slaves in the Family by Edward Ball.

In a question from Kathryn Schultz looking for information about Edward Mozingo: Here is one interview: https://www.wbur.org/npr/165512010/a-white-face-with-a-forgotten-african-family. "Ric Murphy has in his book _Arrival of the First Africans in Virginia_ as in his lectures he includes Edward Mozingo in his list of the 32 Angolans brought to Point Comfort in 1619." VZ: "I've heard Ric Murphy speak to NGS about these first Black people imported 400 years ago, and what happened after. Melanie Hinds: List of Finding Your Roots Episodes:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Finding_Your_Roots_episodes

Robert Marvin: "I apologize for being quietly listening but I have been waiting for a phone call that just came in, so I can now type this message. Love the discussions and information." No need to apologize, there is no duty to speak! It's nice to see you here, Robert.

VZ: "by the way, you can upload your tree to American Ancestors - and your DNA! It took me a while to get it working, but it's possible -- and free. Nadine Guilbault: "UPLOAD to American Ancestors tree and DNA?? I did not know that. Any cost?" Completely free! Of course they want you to join, but all you need is a free account. American AncesTREES: upload both a gedcom and DNA. https://www.familytreemagazine.com/websites/4-reasons-american-ancestrees/
American AncesTREES is a terrible name in my opinion but the site was designed by Dallan Quass who used to head up FamilySearch and created Rootsfinder.

Someone mentioned keeping track of all the sites where one uploads a gedcom and DNA. We have one you can copy; if you prefer to keep it in a spreadsheet that is also efficient. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lCeespvlGumqC0Vom3XZDlzQulntE3Sk3pSUTFGbB8E/edit?usp=sharing If you upload for more than one person, and keep it on a spreadsheet, perhaps keep each person on a different tab. 

Nadine had asked how to find all our blogs: http://skcgs.org/blog.html. Nadine Guilbault: "Thanks, I will check it out." You can subscribe on the SKCGS website. David Hutchinson: https://skcgs.blogspot.com/ - where the blog actually resides. Send your blog contribution to m.strickland@....

Nadine Guilbault: "Thanks, have a good evening."

What a great chat! What did I forget or get wrong?

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her


Kathryn Schultz
 

The discussion yesterday about the southern Illinois
salt mines reminded me of a book I read several years ago,
_Every Hill and Mountain_ by Deborah Heal. (The basis
of the series is a fanciful form of comouterized “time travel,”
but, otherwise, the history in the books is enlightening.)

Kathryn Schultz


On Tue, Jan 25, 2022 at 8:19 AM rebecca dare via groups.io <rdare2=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Sorry I had to leave early yesterday. Great recounting of what I missed, as usual - thanks Valorie!

I'm glad you mentioned RootsFinder - I once did some wonderful "reports" of the locations all my ancestors in each state they were in. I checked into RootsFinder and saw that Dallan will be launching a "Google" just for genealogy sometime this year. You can sign up for a free year, no credit card, etc. that will go into effect when it starts. Here's wrote he wrote: 

"Google tries to be comprehensive but the web is immense. They can’t index everything so they limit how many pages they index from each site. That means you’re missing thousands of possible results when you use google to search the web for genealogy.

OurRoots is a new genealogy-specific search engine that will index (almost) all genealogy on the web. It will launch [in 2022].

I’m the author of RootsFinder.com. I’m currently looking for early users and hope you are interested. Everyone who signs up now will receive a free Pro subscription when we launch.

If you are interested, click on the link below

www.ourroots.com




Dallan

On Monday, January 24, 2022, 09:36:51 PM PST, Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:


2022 January 24 Genealogy Chat

20 Attended; 15 Members: Valorie Cowan Zimmerman, Rebecca Dare, Melanie Hinds, Robert Marvin, Winona Laird, Ileen Peterson, Alexis Hacker Scholz, Kathryn Schultz, MaryLynn Strickland, Annette Gathright, Margi, David Hutchinson, Cheri Sayer, T Briggs, Nadine Guilbault, and 5 guests: Karen Harrison, Kevin Schilt, JoAnn Lawrence, Bev Cato, Sandra Wilson Alto.

Welcome! This genealogy chat is brought to you by the South King County Genealogical Society. We'd love to have you as a Member: http://skcgs.org/membership.html

Today's blog: https://skcgs.blogspot.com/2022/01/voila-finding-context-for-your-research.html. Kevin Schilt: "That is cool."

Kevin Schilt, commenting on JoAnn's lovely tatted image: "Joann that is beautiful!"

Cheri Sayer: "Hi!  I'm in Palm Springs and just returned to my room for lunch and saw the email reminder." 

Kathryn Schultz told us about a recent connection she made: "Dr. Benes’s brother was an English professor at my college, Southwestern at Memphis, now Rhodes College."

Sandra Wilson Alto: "Might have to just listen as there is a loud shredder going in my neighbors garden!" Thank you Sandra! We all appreciate fellow online meeting participants who remember to mute while not speaking.

We discussed the power of uploading both a gedcom and DNA to MyHeritage. The size of the tree you can maintain there is limited to 1000 unless you pay for a subscription. Even that is very useful if you have more recent European ancestors. 

Another place to upload a full tree & DNA is Geneanet. Sandra Wilson Alto: "What about Geneanet for European trees. I have found my husband's Finnish side." 

And don't forget Geni, an older site that many Europeans have used. You can link there to a FamilyTreeDNA DNA kit, another reason to upload to FamilyTreeDNA! Don't forget to upload the gedcom there too -- while clunky, if you link your matches to your tree, it can be very powerful as the system will auto-sort your matches. Can anyone think of another site that has been useful to you where you can have both a tree and DNA? 

I certainly advocate for Wikitree although I suggest *not* uploading more than a tiny gedcom, and like Geni, you only link to your DNA, not upload it. One cool feature is that *all* DNA can be linked to, no matter where you have it. 

VZ: "I define "completionist" as finding and linking every single record for every single person in the family -- including all spouses, step-children, etc. -- the whole FAN club. I find it useful especially on FamilySearch Family Tree, because the sources and citations are so conveniently arranged. I do that intensively before creating WikiTree profiles so I can paste in all those citations before building the biography.

Valorie Cowan Zimmerman: "Hey Tom! welcome. Long time no see! How are you?" T Briggs: Hi Valorie and group, I am doing fine just can't seem to find time for meeting and Genealogy. Still caregiving and learning to cook and clean house :)😲: VZ: "So good to see you Tom. {{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{hugs}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}"

Alexis Hacker Scholz: "Hi, Kevin. Glad to see you." Kevin Schilt: "Good to see you AH."

For Ileen: "There is a group in Seattle for Swedish Finns called the Swedish Finn Historical Society: http://swedishfinnhistoricalsociety.org        
    phone:  206-706-0738 email:  info@...
~~Meets annually, 2nd Sat. in March at the Swedish Club, 1920 Dexter Ave. North, Seattle, WA.  Meetings are open to members and invited guests.
The Swedish Finn Historical Society is a WA Non-Profit Corp., associated with the Swedish Club.  They maintain a genealogical resource library and provide research services.  Hours are:  Mondays, 9am-12:30pm; Wednesdays, 2pm-5pm; Thursdays, 9am-12:30pm and the 1st Sunday of the month, 10am-2pm.  Online databases are available on the website for members.  Special Collections include; DEE Database (Document Every Emigrant) with over 38,000 entries, digitalized "Leading Star" newspapers, Order of Runeberg Lodge records, 14,000 Obits of Swedish Finn immigrants, Emmaus Lutheran Church records and a photo database with names." All this from the Washington State Genealogical Society page with all the known gen societies in the state: https://www.wasgs.org/cpage.php?pt=86

The name of the book Kevin mentioned: Slaves, Salt, Sex & Mr. Crenshaw: The Real Story of the Old Slave House and America's Reverse Underground R.R. On Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Slaves-Salt-Sex-Mr-Crenshaw/dp/0970798458/

Kevin Schilt: "Valerie, you might want to contact Lyles Station Indiana Museum. It is a rural community with an African American Museum. One of the few rural African American communities left. https://www.facebook.com/LylesStation/ and website: http://www.lylesstation.org/." VZ: "Thanks! I imagine the US Black Heritage project on Wikitree would like that link."

VZ: "There are lots of reasons people want to leave - sometimes the small everyday indignities that Black folks had to endure made them want to move to a fresh place where maybe they would find something closer to dignity and equality."

Join if you would like to help with the research of the Black miners in Franklin: https://skcgs.groups.io/g/Black-Heritage-Franklin

Cheri Sayer: "I'm having trouble with my computer cord and battery and the laptop is running out of juice. Can't seem to get it to charge, so I'll have to go soon." VZ: Glad you could make it today, Cheri. I'm sorry to hear of your laptop problems. I hope you can replace that battery." Ileen Peterson: "Get a HALO to support/recharge laptop or other devices-including automobiles!! My favorite Xmas gift!"

Kevin Schilt: "Sorry, have to go. Always enjoy this."

While discussing the Nordic annual household survey records, which were taken and kept by the church, which in effect was the government before modern times, I said, "The Swedish household records are wonderful. Not all are available but so many are, some back to the 1600s. Another resource for European trees and records is Geni. I find loads of stuff by Googling for it in Geni. And don't forget to check Find a Grave, Interment.net and BillionGraves. There may be other sites in each country as well.

JoAnn Lawrence: "Great chat, thank you. It's dinner time here on the East Coast. Stay safe and healthy." Thanks for joining in today, JoAnn. Hope to see you again.

While discussing the beginning of the Great Migration of Black folks from the Old South to the north and west for jobs, MaryLynn talked a bit about the Exodusters moving from the South to the mid-West to farm on free land in the 1870s. Some of those people ended up moving to Liberia, part of the Back to Africa movement. Most did not, of course. https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/exodusters.htm and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exodusters

VZ: "Hi Nadine!: Nadine Guilbault: "Sorry for being late, I was busy working on an article. Oops." No excuses needed. We're happy to see you here.

Re: slavery in Canada -- even where there was *not* slavery, there was - in some places - prejudice and other problems. One book showing what descendants of slave holders can do: Slaves in the Family by Edward Ball.

In a question from Kathryn Schultz looking for information about Edward Mozingo: Here is one interview: https://www.wbur.org/npr/165512010/a-white-face-with-a-forgotten-african-family. "Ric Murphy has in his book _Arrival of the First Africans in Virginia_ as in his lectures he includes Edward Mozingo in his list of the 32 Angolans brought to Point Comfort in 1619." VZ: "I've heard Ric Murphy speak to NGS about these first Black people imported 400 years ago, and what happened after. Melanie Hinds: List of Finding Your Roots Episodes:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Finding_Your_Roots_episodes

Robert Marvin: "I apologize for being quietly listening but I have been waiting for a phone call that just came in, so I can now type this message. Love the discussions and information." No need to apologize, there is no duty to speak! It's nice to see you here, Robert.

VZ: "by the way, you can upload your tree to American Ancestors - and your DNA! It took me a while to get it working, but it's possible -- and free. Nadine Guilbault: "UPLOAD to American Ancestors tree and DNA?? I did not know that. Any cost?" Completely free! Of course they want you to join, but all you need is a free account. American AncesTREES: upload both a gedcom and DNA. https://www.familytreemagazine.com/websites/4-reasons-american-ancestrees/
American AncesTREES is a terrible name in my opinion but the site was designed by Dallan Quass who used to head up FamilySearch and created Rootsfinder.

Someone mentioned keeping track of all the sites where one uploads a gedcom and DNA. We have one you can copy; if you prefer to keep it in a spreadsheet that is also efficient. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lCeespvlGumqC0Vom3XZDlzQulntE3Sk3pSUTFGbB8E/edit?usp=sharing If you upload for more than one person, and keep it on a spreadsheet, perhaps keep each person on a different tab. 

Nadine had asked how to find all our blogs: http://skcgs.org/blog.html. Nadine Guilbault: "Thanks, I will check it out." You can subscribe on the SKCGS website. David Hutchinson: https://skcgs.blogspot.com/ - where the blog actually resides. Send your blog contribution to m.strickland@....

Nadine Guilbault: "Thanks, have a good evening."

What a great chat! What did I forget or get wrong?

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her


 

Cool news, Rebecca! There is already a search engine somewhat like that at Linkpendium, their Family Discoverer Search Engine: http://www.linkpendium.com/

Enjoy,

Valorie



On Tue, Jan 25, 2022 at 6:19 AM rebecca dare via groups.io <rdare2=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Sorry I had to leave early yesterday. Great recounting of what I missed, as usual - thanks Valorie!

I'm glad you mentioned RootsFinder - I once did some wonderful "reports" of the locations all my ancestors in each state they were in. I checked into RootsFinder and saw that Dallan will be launching a "Google" just for genealogy sometime this year. You can sign up for a free year, no credit card, etc. that will go into effect when it starts. Here's wrote he wrote: 

"Google tries to be comprehensive but the web is immense. They can’t index everything so they limit how many pages they index from each site. That means you’re missing thousands of possible results when you use google to search the web for genealogy.

OurRoots is a new genealogy-specific search engine that will index (almost) all genealogy on the web. It will launch [in 2022].

I’m the author of RootsFinder.com. I’m currently looking for early users and hope you are interested. Everyone who signs up now will receive a free Pro subscription when we launch.

If you are interested, click on the link below

www.ourroots.com




Dallan

On Monday, January 24, 2022, 09:36:51 PM PST, Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:


2022 January 24 Genealogy Chat

20 Attended; 15 Members: Valorie Cowan Zimmerman, Rebecca Dare, Melanie Hinds, Robert Marvin, Winona Laird, Ileen Peterson, Alexis Hacker Scholz, Kathryn Schultz, MaryLynn Strickland, Annette Gathright, Margi, David Hutchinson, Cheri Sayer, T Briggs, Nadine Guilbault, and 5 guests: Karen Harrison, Kevin Schilt, JoAnn Lawrence, Bev Cato, Sandra Wilson Alto.

Welcome! This genealogy chat is brought to you by the South King County Genealogical Society. We'd love to have you as a Member: http://skcgs.org/membership.html

Today's blog: https://skcgs.blogspot.com/2022/01/voila-finding-context-for-your-research.html. Kevin Schilt: "That is cool."

Kevin Schilt, commenting on JoAnn's lovely tatted image: "Joann that is beautiful!"

Cheri Sayer: "Hi!  I'm in Palm Springs and just returned to my room for lunch and saw the email reminder." 

Kathryn Schultz told us about a recent connection she made: "Dr. Benes’s brother was an English professor at my college, Southwestern at Memphis, now Rhodes College."

Sandra Wilson Alto: "Might have to just listen as there is a loud shredder going in my neighbors garden!" Thank you Sandra! We all appreciate fellow online meeting participants who remember to mute while not speaking.

We discussed the power of uploading both a gedcom and DNA to MyHeritage. The size of the tree you can maintain there is limited to 1000 unless you pay for a subscription. Even that is very useful if you have more recent European ancestors. 

Another place to upload a full tree & DNA is Geneanet. Sandra Wilson Alto: "What about Geneanet for European trees. I have found my husband's Finnish side." 

And don't forget Geni, an older site that many Europeans have used. You can link there to a FamilyTreeDNA DNA kit, another reason to upload to FamilyTreeDNA! Don't forget to upload the gedcom there too -- while clunky, if you link your matches to your tree, it can be very powerful as the system will auto-sort your matches. Can anyone think of another site that has been useful to you where you can have both a tree and DNA? 

I certainly advocate for Wikitree although I suggest *not* uploading more than a tiny gedcom, and like Geni, you only link to your DNA, not upload it. One cool feature is that *all* DNA can be linked to, no matter where you have it. 

VZ: "I define "completionist" as finding and linking every single record for every single person in the family -- including all spouses, step-children, etc. -- the whole FAN club. I find it useful especially on FamilySearch Family Tree, because the sources and citations are so conveniently arranged. I do that intensively before creating WikiTree profiles so I can paste in all those citations before building the biography.

Valorie Cowan Zimmerman: "Hey Tom! welcome. Long time no see! How are you?" T Briggs: Hi Valorie and group, I am doing fine just can't seem to find time for meeting and Genealogy. Still caregiving and learning to cook and clean house :)😲: VZ: "So good to see you Tom. {{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{hugs}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}"

Alexis Hacker Scholz: "Hi, Kevin. Glad to see you." Kevin Schilt: "Good to see you AH."

For Ileen: "There is a group in Seattle for Swedish Finns called the Swedish Finn Historical Society: http://swedishfinnhistoricalsociety.org        
    phone:  206-706-0738 email:  info@...
~~Meets annually, 2nd Sat. in March at the Swedish Club, 1920 Dexter Ave. North, Seattle, WA.  Meetings are open to members and invited guests.
The Swedish Finn Historical Society is a WA Non-Profit Corp., associated with the Swedish Club.  They maintain a genealogical resource library and provide research services.  Hours are:  Mondays, 9am-12:30pm; Wednesdays, 2pm-5pm; Thursdays, 9am-12:30pm and the 1st Sunday of the month, 10am-2pm.  Online databases are available on the website for members.  Special Collections include; DEE Database (Document Every Emigrant) with over 38,000 entries, digitalized "Leading Star" newspapers, Order of Runeberg Lodge records, 14,000 Obits of Swedish Finn immigrants, Emmaus Lutheran Church records and a photo database with names." All this from the Washington State Genealogical Society page with all the known gen societies in the state: https://www.wasgs.org/cpage.php?pt=86

The name of the book Kevin mentioned: Slaves, Salt, Sex & Mr. Crenshaw: The Real Story of the Old Slave House and America's Reverse Underground R.R. On Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Slaves-Salt-Sex-Mr-Crenshaw/dp/0970798458/

Kevin Schilt: "Valerie, you might want to contact Lyles Station Indiana Museum. It is a rural community with an African American Museum. One of the few rural African American communities left. https://www.facebook.com/LylesStation/ and website: http://www.lylesstation.org/." VZ: "Thanks! I imagine the US Black Heritage project on Wikitree would like that link."

VZ: "There are lots of reasons people want to leave - sometimes the small everyday indignities that Black folks had to endure made them want to move to a fresh place where maybe they would find something closer to dignity and equality."

Join if you would like to help with the research of the Black miners in Franklin: https://skcgs.groups.io/g/Black-Heritage-Franklin

Cheri Sayer: "I'm having trouble with my computer cord and battery and the laptop is running out of juice. Can't seem to get it to charge, so I'll have to go soon." VZ: Glad you could make it today, Cheri. I'm sorry to hear of your laptop problems. I hope you can replace that battery." Ileen Peterson: "Get a HALO to support/recharge laptop or other devices-including automobiles!! My favorite Xmas gift!"

Kevin Schilt: "Sorry, have to go. Always enjoy this."

While discussing the Nordic annual household survey records, which were taken and kept by the church, which in effect was the government before modern times, I said, "The Swedish household records are wonderful. Not all are available but so many are, some back to the 1600s. Another resource for European trees and records is Geni. I find loads of stuff by Googling for it in Geni. And don't forget to check Find a Grave, Interment.net and BillionGraves. There may be other sites in each country as well.

JoAnn Lawrence: "Great chat, thank you. It's dinner time here on the East Coast. Stay safe and healthy." Thanks for joining in today, JoAnn. Hope to see you again.

While discussing the beginning of the Great Migration of Black folks from the Old South to the north and west for jobs, MaryLynn talked a bit about the Exodusters moving from the South to the mid-West to farm on free land in the 1870s. Some of those people ended up moving to Liberia, part of the Back to Africa movement. Most did not, of course. https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/exodusters.htm and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exodusters

VZ: "Hi Nadine!: Nadine Guilbault: "Sorry for being late, I was busy working on an article. Oops." No excuses needed. We're happy to see you here.

Re: slavery in Canada -- even where there was *not* slavery, there was - in some places - prejudice and other problems. One book showing what descendants of slave holders can do: Slaves in the Family by Edward Ball.

In a question from Kathryn Schultz looking for information about Edward Mozingo: Here is one interview: https://www.wbur.org/npr/165512010/a-white-face-with-a-forgotten-african-family. "Ric Murphy has in his book _Arrival of the First Africans in Virginia_ as in his lectures he includes Edward Mozingo in his list of the 32 Angolans brought to Point Comfort in 1619." VZ: "I've heard Ric Murphy speak to NGS about these first Black people imported 400 years ago, and what happened after. Melanie Hinds: List of Finding Your Roots Episodes:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Finding_Your_Roots_episodes

Robert Marvin: "I apologize for being quietly listening but I have been waiting for a phone call that just came in, so I can now type this message. Love the discussions and information." No need to apologize, there is no duty to speak! It's nice to see you here, Robert.

VZ: "by the way, you can upload your tree to American Ancestors - and your DNA! It took me a while to get it working, but it's possible -- and free. Nadine Guilbault: "UPLOAD to American Ancestors tree and DNA?? I did not know that. Any cost?" Completely free! Of course they want you to join, but all you need is a free account. American AncesTREES: upload both a gedcom and DNA. https://www.familytreemagazine.com/websites/4-reasons-american-ancestrees/
American AncesTREES is a terrible name in my opinion but the site was designed by Dallan Quass who used to head up FamilySearch and created Rootsfinder.

Someone mentioned keeping track of all the sites where one uploads a gedcom and DNA. We have one you can copy; if you prefer to keep it in a spreadsheet that is also efficient. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lCeespvlGumqC0Vom3XZDlzQulntE3Sk3pSUTFGbB8E/edit?usp=sharing If you upload for more than one person, and keep it on a spreadsheet, perhaps keep each person on a different tab. 

Nadine had asked how to find all our blogs: http://skcgs.org/blog.html. Nadine Guilbault: "Thanks, I will check it out." You can subscribe on the SKCGS website. David Hutchinson: https://skcgs.blogspot.com/ - where the blog actually resides. Send your blog contribution to m.strickland@....

Nadine Guilbault: "Thanks, have a good evening."

What a great chat! What did I forget or get wrong?

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



rebecca dare
 

Thanks, I'll try it!

On Thursday, January 27, 2022, 01:06:56 AM PST, Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:


Cool news, Rebecca! There is already a search engine somewhat like that at Linkpendium, their Family Discoverer Search Engine: http://www.linkpendium.com/

Enjoy,

Valorie



On Tue, Jan 25, 2022 at 6:19 AM rebecca dare via groups.io <rdare2=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Sorry I had to leave early yesterday. Great recounting of what I missed, as usual - thanks Valorie!

I'm glad you mentioned RootsFinder - I once did some wonderful "reports" of the locations all my ancestors in each state they were in. I checked into RootsFinder and saw that Dallan will be launching a "Google" just for genealogy sometime this year. You can sign up for a free year, no credit card, etc. that will go into effect when it starts. Here's wrote he wrote: 

"Google tries to be comprehensive but the web is immense. They can’t index everything so they limit how many pages they index from each site. That means you’re missing thousands of possible results when you use google to search the web for genealogy.

OurRoots is a new genealogy-specific search engine that will index (almost) all genealogy on the web. It will launch [in 2022].

I’m the author of RootsFinder.com. I’m currently looking for early users and hope you are interested. Everyone who signs up now will receive a free Pro subscription when we launch.

If you are interested, click on the link below

www.ourroots.com




Dallan

On Monday, January 24, 2022, 09:36:51 PM PST, Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:


2022 January 24 Genealogy Chat

20 Attended; 15 Members: Valorie Cowan Zimmerman, Rebecca Dare, Melanie Hinds, Robert Marvin, Winona Laird, Ileen Peterson, Alexis Hacker Scholz, Kathryn Schultz, MaryLynn Strickland, Annette Gathright, Margi, David Hutchinson, Cheri Sayer, T Briggs, Nadine Guilbault, and 5 guests: Karen Harrison, Kevin Schilt, JoAnn Lawrence, Bev Cato, Sandra Wilson Alto.

Welcome! This genealogy chat is brought to you by the South King County Genealogical Society. We'd love to have you as a Member: http://skcgs.org/membership.html

Today's blog: https://skcgs.blogspot.com/2022/01/voila-finding-context-for-your-research.html. Kevin Schilt: "That is cool."

Kevin Schilt, commenting on JoAnn's lovely tatted image: "Joann that is beautiful!"

Cheri Sayer: "Hi!  I'm in Palm Springs and just returned to my room for lunch and saw the email reminder." 

Kathryn Schultz told us about a recent connection she made: "Dr. Benes’s brother was an English professor at my college, Southwestern at Memphis, now Rhodes College."

Sandra Wilson Alto: "Might have to just listen as there is a loud shredder going in my neighbors garden!" Thank you Sandra! We all appreciate fellow online meeting participants who remember to mute while not speaking.

We discussed the power of uploading both a gedcom and DNA to MyHeritage. The size of the tree you can maintain there is limited to 1000 unless you pay for a subscription. Even that is very useful if you have more recent European ancestors. 

Another place to upload a full tree & DNA is Geneanet. Sandra Wilson Alto: "What about Geneanet for European trees. I have found my husband's Finnish side." 

And don't forget Geni, an older site that many Europeans have used. You can link there to a FamilyTreeDNA DNA kit, another reason to upload to FamilyTreeDNA! Don't forget to upload the gedcom there too -- while clunky, if you link your matches to your tree, it can be very powerful as the system will auto-sort your matches. Can anyone think of another site that has been useful to you where you can have both a tree and DNA? 

I certainly advocate for Wikitree although I suggest *not* uploading more than a tiny gedcom, and like Geni, you only link to your DNA, not upload it. One cool feature is that *all* DNA can be linked to, no matter where you have it. 

VZ: "I define "completionist" as finding and linking every single record for every single person in the family -- including all spouses, step-children, etc. -- the whole FAN club. I find it useful especially on FamilySearch Family Tree, because the sources and citations are so conveniently arranged. I do that intensively before creating WikiTree profiles so I can paste in all those citations before building the biography.

Valorie Cowan Zimmerman: "Hey Tom! welcome. Long time no see! How are you?" T Briggs: Hi Valorie and group, I am doing fine just can't seem to find time for meeting and Genealogy. Still caregiving and learning to cook and clean house :)😲: VZ: "So good to see you Tom. {{{{{{{{{{{{{{{{hugs}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}}"

Alexis Hacker Scholz: "Hi, Kevin. Glad to see you." Kevin Schilt: "Good to see you AH."

For Ileen: "There is a group in Seattle for Swedish Finns called the Swedish Finn Historical Society: http://swedishfinnhistoricalsociety.org        
    phone:  206-706-0738 email:  info@...
~~Meets annually, 2nd Sat. in March at the Swedish Club, 1920 Dexter Ave. North, Seattle, WA.  Meetings are open to members and invited guests.
The Swedish Finn Historical Society is a WA Non-Profit Corp., associated with the Swedish Club.  They maintain a genealogical resource library and provide research services.  Hours are:  Mondays, 9am-12:30pm; Wednesdays, 2pm-5pm; Thursdays, 9am-12:30pm and the 1st Sunday of the month, 10am-2pm.  Online databases are available on the website for members.  Special Collections include; DEE Database (Document Every Emigrant) with over 38,000 entries, digitalized "Leading Star" newspapers, Order of Runeberg Lodge records, 14,000 Obits of Swedish Finn immigrants, Emmaus Lutheran Church records and a photo database with names." All this from the Washington State Genealogical Society page with all the known gen societies in the state: https://www.wasgs.org/cpage.php?pt=86

The name of the book Kevin mentioned: Slaves, Salt, Sex & Mr. Crenshaw: The Real Story of the Old Slave House and America's Reverse Underground R.R. On Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Slaves-Salt-Sex-Mr-Crenshaw/dp/0970798458/

Kevin Schilt: "Valerie, you might want to contact Lyles Station Indiana Museum. It is a rural community with an African American Museum. One of the few rural African American communities left. https://www.facebook.com/LylesStation/ and website: http://www.lylesstation.org/." VZ: "Thanks! I imagine the US Black Heritage project on Wikitree would like that link."

VZ: "There are lots of reasons people want to leave - sometimes the small everyday indignities that Black folks had to endure made them want to move to a fresh place where maybe they would find something closer to dignity and equality."

Join if you would like to help with the research of the Black miners in Franklin: https://skcgs.groups.io/g/Black-Heritage-Franklin

Cheri Sayer: "I'm having trouble with my computer cord and battery and the laptop is running out of juice. Can't seem to get it to charge, so I'll have to go soon." VZ: Glad you could make it today, Cheri. I'm sorry to hear of your laptop problems. I hope you can replace that battery." Ileen Peterson: "Get a HALO to support/recharge laptop or other devices-including automobiles!! My favorite Xmas gift!"

Kevin Schilt: "Sorry, have to go. Always enjoy this."

While discussing the Nordic annual household survey records, which were taken and kept by the church, which in effect was the government before modern times, I said, "The Swedish household records are wonderful. Not all are available but so many are, some back to the 1600s. Another resource for European trees and records is Geni. I find loads of stuff by Googling for it in Geni. And don't forget to check Find a Grave, Interment.net and BillionGraves. There may be other sites in each country as well.

JoAnn Lawrence: "Great chat, thank you. It's dinner time here on the East Coast. Stay safe and healthy." Thanks for joining in today, JoAnn. Hope to see you again.

While discussing the beginning of the Great Migration of Black folks from the Old South to the north and west for jobs, MaryLynn talked a bit about the Exodusters moving from the South to the mid-West to farm on free land in the 1870s. Some of those people ended up moving to Liberia, part of the Back to Africa movement. Most did not, of course. https://www.nps.gov/home/learn/historyculture/exodusters.htm and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exodusters

VZ: "Hi Nadine!: Nadine Guilbault: "Sorry for being late, I was busy working on an article. Oops." No excuses needed. We're happy to see you here.

Re: slavery in Canada -- even where there was *not* slavery, there was - in some places - prejudice and other problems. One book showing what descendants of slave holders can do: Slaves in the Family by Edward Ball.

In a question from Kathryn Schultz looking for information about Edward Mozingo: Here is one interview: https://www.wbur.org/npr/165512010/a-white-face-with-a-forgotten-african-family. "Ric Murphy has in his book _Arrival of the First Africans in Virginia_ as in his lectures he includes Edward Mozingo in his list of the 32 Angolans brought to Point Comfort in 1619." VZ: "I've heard Ric Murphy speak to NGS about these first Black people imported 400 years ago, and what happened after. Melanie Hinds: List of Finding Your Roots Episodes:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Finding_Your_Roots_episodes

Robert Marvin: "I apologize for being quietly listening but I have been waiting for a phone call that just came in, so I can now type this message. Love the discussions and information." No need to apologize, there is no duty to speak! It's nice to see you here, Robert.

VZ: "by the way, you can upload your tree to American Ancestors - and your DNA! It took me a while to get it working, but it's possible -- and free. Nadine Guilbault: "UPLOAD to American Ancestors tree and DNA?? I did not know that. Any cost?" Completely free! Of course they want you to join, but all you need is a free account. American AncesTREES: upload both a gedcom and DNA. https://www.familytreemagazine.com/websites/4-reasons-american-ancestrees/
American AncesTREES is a terrible name in my opinion but the site was designed by Dallan Quass who used to head up FamilySearch and created Rootsfinder.

Someone mentioned keeping track of all the sites where one uploads a gedcom and DNA. We have one you can copy; if you prefer to keep it in a spreadsheet that is also efficient. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1lCeespvlGumqC0Vom3XZDlzQulntE3Sk3pSUTFGbB8E/edit?usp=sharing If you upload for more than one person, and keep it on a spreadsheet, perhaps keep each person on a different tab. 

Nadine had asked how to find all our blogs: http://skcgs.org/blog.html. Nadine Guilbault: "Thanks, I will check it out." You can subscribe on the SKCGS website. David Hutchinson: https://skcgs.blogspot.com/ - where the blog actually resides. Send your blog contribution to m.strickland@....

Nadine Guilbault: "Thanks, have a good evening."

What a great chat! What did I forget or get wrong?

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her