Date   

Re: South King County Genealogy Society Blog

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 

Thank you, Rebecca.

Please do put together some of your grandmother's writings; what a wonderful gift to share.

ML

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of rebecca dare via groups.io <rdare2@...>
Sent: Monday, August 17, 2020 4:55 PM
To: society@skcgs.groups.io <society@skcgs.groups.io>; Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] South King County Genealogy Society Blog
 
MaryLynn -- wonderful story about your gggrandmother and your research. You're inspiring me to put something together about my grandmother. It will be incomplete but there were some writings by her I'd love to share as a sort of portrait of time and place.

Rebecca Dare

On Monday, August 17, 2020, 12:37:58 PM PDT, South King County Genealogy Society Blog via groups.io <noreply+feedproxy@...> wrote:


South King County Genealogy Society Blog

My Inspiration

Posted: 17 Aug 2020 10:00 AM PDT

 

Anna Wood Dyer

Anna Wood Dyer Biography

At a recent virtual meeting, someone asked if others had one ancestor who had inspired them either to start family history or to keep researching.  It didn’t take me long to think of my gggrandmother Anna Wood Dyer as my inspiration.  After briefly relating my discoveries about her, someone suggested she would make a good blog topic.

“No problem,” I thought, “I’ll dust off and update one of the biographies I’ve written about her.”  Looking back at the discoveries and development of her life story I realize something else—the timeline of my growth as a researcher.  Throughout this family history quest, Anna has been the most elusive with the least information available.  And yet, at this point I personally feel I know her better because I have had to learn so much about her environment and the events that must have impacted her life.

Anna has never seemed like a brick wall, only a weight bearing wall around which a family grew.  I can see beyond to her ancestors but after nineteen years, I still have no documentation about her birth or parentage.



Page from Anna's Bible



Born 10 June, 1810 in Vermont

Died 24 September, 1888, Coeur d’Alene, Kootenai, Idaho Territory

Married Charles Dyer about 1838, Bennington, Bennington, Vermont

 

These were the known events in the life of Anna Wood when my mother’s cousin did his family history work in the late 1950s.  When I started in 2001, I had only that information to go on and with that common name, not much hope of singling her out of a myriad of other Anna Woods.

I wasn’t particularly interested in going to cemeteries but finally decided to take some pictures of her headstone.  It was while looking at that stone, especially the legend, that I felt the connection.  Without this woman, I would not exist.  Perhaps she was asking me to discover and tell her unique story.

A newspaper clipping obituary, for a wife of someone who could have been a relative, led to a Wood family in Bennington, Vermont; there were seven boys and the widower was a son of one of the younger boys.  Circumstantial evidence of relationship.  Anna gave one of her sons a name very similar to the husband of another possible cousin.  Again, circumstantial. Through the process of elimination I determined that Anna’s father must be one of the two oldest boys, Isaac or Billa.

Pleas for some sort of sign, (yes, I believe in serendipity) led me to looking beyond Vermont, sometimes following the wrong Isaac but finding a younger one the right age to be Anna’s brother.  He was in Wyoming County, New York, in the 1850 census with a son named Dyer Wood.  In 1837 Anna married Charles Dyer.  Did her probable brother name a son in honor of his brother-in-law?  In the neighborhood was a young Billa Wood, right age to be another son of this Isaac.

In the 1860 census this family unit, Isaac with wife Betsey and sons Ira and Dyer were living in Wisconsin.  On the same page were young Billa, his wife Mary and 87 year old Billa!





A Family for Anna

It was about this time that I received scans of some old photos that had belonged to Anna.  Among them was a man with the name Isaac Wood written on the mat.  In the index he was identified as “Grandma’s brother”.  That scream you heard back in July, 2005 was me!



Betsey Fuller Wood

Isaac Wood    

















Poking around in online records, both indexed and unindexed I found that Billa had married Hannah Millington and moved from Bennington County to Franklin County, Vermont.  The family shows up in each of the censuses from 1800 through 1840.  In some of them the census taker listed Billa as W. Wood as if his name might have been William.  Careful tracking shows that there were several more children but so far I have only identified Isaac and Anna.

Through several more years of hit and miss research and stacks of circumstantial evidence, I reached the conclusion that Anna’s parents were probably Billa Wood and Hannah Millington.  I added them to my family tree knowing I might have to change things if I ever found proof otherwise.

In the 1820s Billa and Hannah moved to White Creek, Washington, New York.  There are several land transactions in that area from late 1820s into the 1840s.  It was interesting that the transactions always included both Billa and Hannah.

The Troy (NY) Daily Whig published a little notice that Charles Dyer and Anna Wood, both of Shaftsbury, Vermont, were married on March 31, 1837, in Troy.

Children of Charles and Anna (Wood) Dyer:
                Albert Myron Dyer  1840
                Mary Dyer  1842
                George Phillips Dyer  1845
all born in Vermont

In the mid 1850s the family moved to Kenosha County, Wisconsin where daughter Mary married Solomon Stowe in 1858.

Charles and Anna Dyer moved to Minnesota with Solomon and Mary where they homesteaded in Mapleton, Blue Earth County.  Charles died there in 1877.

All the Way to Coeur d’Alene

Early in 1888, Solomon with his two older sons, Charlie and George, ventured west to Coeur d’Alene, Idaho Territory, where they selected land for homesteading.  A few months later Mary and the younger children, Lizzie and Edwin, followed with her mother Anna.  Anna died about three weeks after their arrival.  She was 78 years old.




What strength she must have had.  During her lifetime she survived a spotted fever epidemic that took the lives of her Uncle Isaac and three of his children, all in the same week of January, 1814.  Her family lived through the 1816 Year Without a Summer. 

She saw the building of the Erie Canal and other waterways in New York state.  She saw the development of the railroad and the growth of Wisconsin and Minnesota, receiving the Minnesota homestead land patent in her own name after the death of her husband.  Both of her sons served in the Civil War.

When I tested with Family Tree DNA I found lots of distant cousins but there were none that showed up as my Dyer or Wood families.  Next I decided to test with Ancestry because two known first cousins had tested there and that would help triangulate connections.

The morning that results came online I was browsing through possible fourth cousins when I found a connection with someone who was a direct descendent of Samuel Millington, 1749 to 1823, Shaftsbury, Bennington, Vermont.  Samuel’s probate was filed by Billa Wood, husband of Samuel’s daughter Hannah. 


Confirming with DNA Evidence





A distant match at Family Tree DNA contacted me looking for our connection.  While I found connections in two family lines, the most recent common ancestor was at the 7 great grand level.  However, he also had families in my Wood and Millington lines, thereby further confirming Anna’s parents.

Among the pictures I received in 2005 were several of one woman who were not identified, or rather, Grandma Anna Dyer was identified but the picture had been moved to another spot.  This is my first presentation of a picture that is probably Anna Wood Dyer.

After nineteen years of research I hear her telling me, “This story is not about me; it’s about the journey of discovery!”  That journey continues.


Anna Wood Dyer

 

You are subscribed to email updates from South King County Genealogy Society Blog.
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States


Re: South King County Genealogy Society Blog

rebecca dare
 

MaryLynn -- wonderful story about your gggrandmother and your research. You're inspiring me to put something together about my grandmother. It will be incomplete but there were some writings by her I'd love to share as a sort of portrait of time and place.

Rebecca Dare

On Monday, August 17, 2020, 12:37:58 PM PDT, South King County Genealogy Society Blog via groups.io <noreply+feedproxy@...> wrote:


South King County Genealogy Society Blog

My Inspiration

Posted: 17 Aug 2020 10:00 AM PDT

 

Anna Wood Dyer

Anna Wood Dyer Biography

At a recent virtual meeting, someone asked if others had one ancestor who had inspired them either to start family history or to keep researching.  It didn’t take me long to think of my gggrandmother Anna Wood Dyer as my inspiration.  After briefly relating my discoveries about her, someone suggested she would make a good blog topic.

“No problem,” I thought, “I’ll dust off and update one of the biographies I’ve written about her.”  Looking back at the discoveries and development of her life story I realize something else—the timeline of my growth as a researcher.  Throughout this family history quest, Anna has been the most elusive with the least information available.  And yet, at this point I personally feel I know her better because I have had to learn so much about her environment and the events that must have impacted her life.

Anna has never seemed like a brick wall, only a weight bearing wall around which a family grew.  I can see beyond to her ancestors but after nineteen years, I still have no documentation about her birth or parentage.



Page from Anna's Bible



Born 10 June, 1810 in Vermont

Died 24 September, 1888, Coeur d’Alene, Kootenai, Idaho Territory

Married Charles Dyer about 1838, Bennington, Bennington, Vermont

 

These were the known events in the life of Anna Wood when my mother’s cousin did his family history work in the late 1950s.  When I started in 2001, I had only that information to go on and with that common name, not much hope of singling her out of a myriad of other Anna Woods.

I wasn’t particularly interested in going to cemeteries but finally decided to take some pictures of her headstone.  It was while looking at that stone, especially the legend, that I felt the connection.  Without this woman, I would not exist.  Perhaps she was asking me to discover and tell her unique story.

A newspaper clipping obituary, for a wife of someone who could have been a relative, led to a Wood family in Bennington, Vermont; there were seven boys and the widower was a son of one of the younger boys.  Circumstantial evidence of relationship.  Anna gave one of her sons a name very similar to the husband of another possible cousin.  Again, circumstantial. Through the process of elimination I determined that Anna’s father must be one of the two oldest boys, Isaac or Billa.

Pleas for some sort of sign, (yes, I believe in serendipity) led me to looking beyond Vermont, sometimes following the wrong Isaac but finding a younger one the right age to be Anna’s brother.  He was in Wyoming County, New York, in the 1850 census with a son named Dyer Wood.  In 1837 Anna married Charles Dyer.  Did her probable brother name a son in honor of his brother-in-law?  In the neighborhood was a young Billa Wood, right age to be another son of this Isaac.

In the 1860 census this family unit, Isaac with wife Betsey and sons Ira and Dyer were living in Wisconsin.  On the same page were young Billa, his wife Mary and 87 year old Billa!





A Family for Anna

It was about this time that I received scans of some old photos that had belonged to Anna.  Among them was a man with the name Isaac Wood written on the mat.  In the index he was identified as “Grandma’s brother”.  That scream you heard back in July, 2005 was me!



Betsey Fuller Wood

Isaac Wood    

















Poking around in online records, both indexed and unindexed I found that Billa had married Hannah Millington and moved from Bennington County to Franklin County, Vermont.  The family shows up in each of the censuses from 1800 through 1840.  In some of them the census taker listed Billa as W. Wood as if his name might have been William.  Careful tracking shows that there were several more children but so far I have only identified Isaac and Anna.

Through several more years of hit and miss research and stacks of circumstantial evidence, I reached the conclusion that Anna’s parents were probably Billa Wood and Hannah Millington.  I added them to my family tree knowing I might have to change things if I ever found proof otherwise.

In the 1820s Billa and Hannah moved to White Creek, Washington, New York.  There are several land transactions in that area from late 1820s into the 1840s.  It was interesting that the transactions always included both Billa and Hannah.

The Troy (NY) Daily Whig published a little notice that Charles Dyer and Anna Wood, both of Shaftsbury, Vermont, were married on March 31, 1837, in Troy.

Children of Charles and Anna (Wood) Dyer:
                Albert Myron Dyer  1840
                Mary Dyer  1842
                George Phillips Dyer  1845
all born in Vermont

In the mid 1850s the family moved to Kenosha County, Wisconsin where daughter Mary married Solomon Stowe in 1858.

Charles and Anna Dyer moved to Minnesota with Solomon and Mary where they homesteaded in Mapleton, Blue Earth County.  Charles died there in 1877.

All the Way to Coeur d’Alene

Early in 1888, Solomon with his two older sons, Charlie and George, ventured west to Coeur d’Alene, Idaho Territory, where they selected land for homesteading.  A few months later Mary and the younger children, Lizzie and Edwin, followed with her mother Anna.  Anna died about three weeks after their arrival.  She was 78 years old.




What strength she must have had.  During her lifetime she survived a spotted fever epidemic that took the lives of her Uncle Isaac and three of his children, all in the same week of January, 1814.  Her family lived through the 1816 Year Without a Summer. 

She saw the building of the Erie Canal and other waterways in New York state.  She saw the development of the railroad and the growth of Wisconsin and Minnesota, receiving the Minnesota homestead land patent in her own name after the death of her husband.  Both of her sons served in the Civil War.

When I tested with Family Tree DNA I found lots of distant cousins but there were none that showed up as my Dyer or Wood families.  Next I decided to test with Ancestry because two known first cousins had tested there and that would help triangulate connections.

The morning that results came online I was browsing through possible fourth cousins when I found a connection with someone who was a direct descendent of Samuel Millington, 1749 to 1823, Shaftsbury, Bennington, Vermont.  Samuel’s probate was filed by Billa Wood, husband of Samuel’s daughter Hannah. 


Confirming with DNA Evidence





A distant match at Family Tree DNA contacted me looking for our connection.  While I found connections in two family lines, the most recent common ancestor was at the 7 great grand level.  However, he also had families in my Wood and Millington lines, thereby further confirming Anna’s parents.

Among the pictures I received in 2005 were several of one woman who were not identified, or rather, Grandma Anna Dyer was identified but the picture had been moved to another spot.  This is my first presentation of a picture that is probably Anna Wood Dyer.

After nineteen years of research I hear her telling me, “This story is not about me; it’s about the journey of discovery!”  That journey continues.


Anna Wood Dyer

 

You are subscribed to email updates from South King County Genealogy Society Blog.
To stop receiving these emails, you may unsubscribe now.
Email delivery powered by Google
Google, 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, United States


SKCGS Genealogy Chat - Mon, 08/24/2020 1:00pm-3:00pm #cal-reminder

Society@SKCGS.groups.io Calendar <Society@...>
 

Reminder: SKCGS Genealogy Chat

When: Monday, 24 August 2020, 1:00pm to 3:00pm, (GMT-07:00) America/Los Angeles

Where:https://meet.google.com/yxb-uynz-zso?authuser=0&hs=122

View Event

Organizer: SKCGS Board Board@... 253-740-2725; text me if you need help getting into the meeting

Description: Genealogy Chat

Meet up and chat about genealogy subjects and topics. We have no agenda; we just like one another!


South King County Genealogy Society Blog

South King County Genealogy Society Blog <noreply+feedproxy@...>
 

South King County Genealogy Society Blog

My Inspiration

Posted: 17 Aug 2020 10:00 AM PDT

 

Anna Wood Dyer

Anna Wood Dyer Biography

At a recent virtual meeting, someone asked if others had one ancestor who had inspired them either to start family history or to keep researching.  It didn’t take me long to think of my gggrandmother Anna Wood Dyer as my inspiration.  After briefly relating my discoveries about her, someone suggested she would make a good blog topic.

“No problem,” I thought, “I’ll dust off and update one of the biographies I’ve written about her.”  Looking back at the discoveries and development of her life story I realize something else—the timeline of my growth as a researcher.  Throughout this family history quest, Anna has been the most elusive with the least information available.  And yet, at this point I personally feel I know her better because I have had to learn so much about her environment and the events that must have impacted her life.

Anna has never seemed like a brick wall, only a weight bearing wall around which a family grew.  I can see beyond to her ancestors but after nineteen years, I still have no documentation about her birth or parentage.



Page from Anna's Bible



Born 10 June, 1810 in Vermont

Died 24 September, 1888, Coeur d’Alene, Kootenai, Idaho Territory

Married Charles Dyer about 1838, Bennington, Bennington, Vermont

 

These were the known events in the life of Anna Wood when my mother’s cousin did his family history work in the late 1950s.  When I started in 2001, I had only that information to go on and with that common name, not much hope of singling her out of a myriad of other Anna Woods.

I wasn’t particularly interested in going to cemeteries but finally decided to take some pictures of her headstone.  It was while looking at that stone, especially the legend, that I felt the connection.  Without this woman, I would not exist.  Perhaps she was asking me to discover and tell her unique story.

A newspaper clipping obituary, for a wife of someone who could have been a relative, led to a Wood family in Bennington, Vermont; there were seven boys and the widower was a son of one of the younger boys.  Circumstantial evidence of relationship.  Anna gave one of her sons a name very similar to the husband of another possible cousin.  Again, circumstantial. Through the process of elimination I determined that Anna’s father must be one of the two oldest boys, Isaac or Billa.

Pleas for some sort of sign, (yes, I believe in serendipity) led me to looking beyond Vermont, sometimes following the wrong Isaac but finding a younger one the right age to be Anna’s brother.  He was in Wyoming County, New York, in the 1850 census with a son named Dyer Wood.  In 1837 Anna married Charles Dyer.  Did her probable brother name a son in honor of his brother-in-law?  In the neighborhood was a young Billa Wood, right age to be another son of this Isaac.

In the 1860 census this family unit, Isaac with wife Betsey and sons Ira and Dyer were living in Wisconsin.  On the same page were young Billa, his wife Mary and 87 year old Billa!





A Family for Anna

It was about this time that I received scans of some old photos that had belonged to Anna.  Among them was a man with the name Isaac Wood written on the mat.  In the index he was identified as “Grandma’s brother”.  That scream you heard back in July, 2005 was me!



Betsey Fuller Wood

Isaac Wood    

















Poking around in online records, both indexed and unindexed I found that Billa had married Hannah Millington and moved from Bennington County to Franklin County, Vermont.  The family shows up in each of the censuses from 1800 through 1840.  In some of them the census taker listed Billa as W. Wood as if his name might have been William.  Careful tracking shows that there were several more children but so far I have only identified Isaac and Anna.

Through several more years of hit and miss research and stacks of circumstantial evidence, I reached the conclusion that Anna’s parents were probably Billa Wood and Hannah Millington.  I added them to my family tree knowing I might have to change things if I ever found proof otherwise.

In the 1820s Billa and Hannah moved to White Creek, Washington, New York.  There are several land transactions in that area from late 1820s into the 1840s.  It was interesting that the transactions always included both Billa and Hannah.

The Troy (NY) Daily Whig published a little notice that Charles Dyer and Anna Wood, both of Shaftsbury, Vermont, were married on March 31, 1837, in Troy.

Children of Charles and Anna (Wood) Dyer:
                Albert Myron Dyer  1840
                Mary Dyer  1842
                George Phillips Dyer  1845
all born in Vermont

In the mid 1850s the family moved to Kenosha County, Wisconsin where daughter Mary married Solomon Stowe in 1858.

Charles and Anna Dyer moved to Minnesota with Solomon and Mary where they homesteaded in Mapleton, Blue Earth County.  Charles died there in 1877.

All the Way to Coeur d’Alene

Early in 1888, Solomon with his two older sons, Charlie and George, ventured west to Coeur d’Alene, Idaho Territory, where they selected land for homesteading.  A few months later Mary and the younger children, Lizzie and Edwin, followed with her mother Anna.  Anna died about three weeks after their arrival.  She was 78 years old.




What strength she must have had.  During her lifetime she survived a spotted fever epidemic that took the lives of her Uncle Isaac and three of his children, all in the same week of January, 1814.  Her family lived through the 1816 Year Without a Summer. 

She saw the building of the Erie Canal and other waterways in New York state.  She saw the development of the railroad and the growth of Wisconsin and Minnesota, receiving the Minnesota homestead land patent in her own name after the death of her husband.  Both of her sons served in the Civil War.

When I tested with Family Tree DNA I found lots of distant cousins but there were none that showed up as my Dyer or Wood families.  Next I decided to test with Ancestry because two known first cousins had tested there and that would help triangulate connections.

The morning that results came online I was browsing through possible fourth cousins when I found a connection with someone who was a direct descendent of Samuel Millington, 1749 to 1823, Shaftsbury, Bennington, Vermont.  Samuel’s probate was filed by Billa Wood, husband of Samuel’s daughter Hannah. 


Confirming with DNA Evidence





A distant match at Family Tree DNA contacted me looking for our connection.  While I found connections in two family lines, the most recent common ancestor was at the 7 great grand level.  However, he also had families in my Wood and Millington lines, thereby further confirming Anna’s parents.

Among the pictures I received in 2005 were several of one woman who were not identified, or rather, Grandma Anna Dyer was identified but the picture had been moved to another spot.  This is my first presentation of a picture that is probably Anna Wood Dyer.

After nineteen years of research I hear her telling me, “This story is not about me; it’s about the journey of discovery!”  That journey continues.


Anna Wood Dyer

 


Re: Finding Women's Records in the Courthouse

 

Thank you Dorothy, I had overlooked that one! -v


On Sun, Aug 16, 2020 at 11:11 PM Dorothy Pretare <dpgen@...> wrote:

Thought you might be interested in the following:

 

Online: Finding Women's Records in the Courthouse

Wednesday, August 19, 2020          2:00PM – 3:30PM

Presented by Janice Lovelace, PhD.

 

More details can be found at: 

https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5ee463d3651c5f45004f54d3




Finding Women's Records in the Courthouse

Dorothy Pretare
 

Thought you might be interested in the following:

 

Online: Finding Women's Records in the Courthouse

Wednesday, August 19, 2020          2:00PM – 3:30PM

Presented by Janice Lovelace, PhD.

 

More details can be found at: 

https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5ee463d3651c5f45004f54d3


Re: Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

Janet Emerson
 

I did register for this.  Hope the link comes through early enough for me to see it. 

 

Jan

 

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Valorie Zimmerman
Sent: Thursday, August 13, 2020 8:39 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

 

Hi Jan, they did use G Meet last time, but not ours. This is a library event which is why each attendee must register. The link will be sent to you once you are registered. 

 

Valore

 

On Wed, Aug 12, 2020 at 2:25 PM Janet Emerson <emersonbobjan2@...> wrote:

Valorie,

Is this going to be on the Google meet site?

Janet

 

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Valorie Zimmerman
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 7:27 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: [SKCGS] Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

 

You heard it here first!

 

Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

 

Our own Barbara Mattoon will give her newly-updated talk Coming to America about how our immigrant ancestors got here, and how to find the records about their journeys on Thursday, August 20, 2020 from 6 - 7:30 pm. 

 

Word will spread quickly, so register soon. 


 

--

http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her


Re: Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

 

Hi Jan, they did use G Meet last time, but not ours. This is a library event which is why each attendee must register. The link will be sent to you once you are registered. 

Valore

On Wed, Aug 12, 2020 at 2:25 PM Janet Emerson <emersonbobjan2@...> wrote:

Valorie,

Is this going to be on the Google meet site?

Janet

 

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Valorie Zimmerman
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 7:27 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: [SKCGS] Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

 

You heard it here first!

 

Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

 

Our own Barbara Mattoon will give her newly-updated talk Coming to America about how our immigrant ancestors got here, and how to find the records about their journeys on Thursday, August 20, 2020 from 6 - 7:30 pm. 

 

Word will spread quickly, so register soon. 



--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Re: KCLS Event: Coming To America, presented by Barbara Mattoon - Thu, 08/20/2020 6:00pm-7:30pm #cal-reminder

Carol Larson
 

I sent in my registration at 6:15 and I got a spot😊😊😊


On Aug 13, 2020, at 6:21 PM, MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:


If you get a warning that the event is full, register for the waiting list anyway.  Some people may not be able to keep the date.

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Society@SKCGS.groups.io Calendar <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, August 13, 2020 6:00 PM
To: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] KCLS Event: Coming To America, presented by Barbara Mattoon - Thu, 08/20/2020 6:00pm-7:30pm #cal-reminder
 

Reminder: KCLS Event: Coming To America, presented by Barbara Mattoon

When: Thursday, 20 August 2020, 6:00pm to 7:30pm, (GMT-07:00) America/Los Angeles

Where:Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

View Event

Organizer: King County Library System dyabrown@...

Description:

For adults.

Presented by Barbara Mattoon and South King County Genealogical Society.

The United States has primarily been peopled by immigrants. Locating the records of our ancestors is an important part of our genealogical research. This presentation discusses research tactics to help you locate your immigrants ancestor's arrival records and explore the many resources available in books, online, and in repositories. 
 
Barbara Mattoon is a genealogist, family historian, world traveler, photographer, amongst many other titles. Washington has been her lifelong home - except for brief sojourns in California, Texas, and Arkansas. Barbara is President of the South King County Genealogical Society. 
 
 


Re: KCLS Event: Coming To America, presented by Barbara Mattoon - Thu, 08/20/2020 6:00pm-7:30pm #cal-reminder

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 

If you get a warning that the event is full, register for the waiting list anyway.  Some people may not be able to keep the date.

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Society@SKCGS.groups.io Calendar <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, August 13, 2020 6:00 PM
To: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] KCLS Event: Coming To America, presented by Barbara Mattoon - Thu, 08/20/2020 6:00pm-7:30pm #cal-reminder
 

Reminder: KCLS Event: Coming To America, presented by Barbara Mattoon

When: Thursday, 20 August 2020, 6:00pm to 7:30pm, (GMT-07:00) America/Los Angeles

Where:Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

View Event

Organizer: King County Library System dyabrown@...

Description:

For adults.

Presented by Barbara Mattoon and South King County Genealogical Society.

The United States has primarily been peopled by immigrants. Locating the records of our ancestors is an important part of our genealogical research. This presentation discusses research tactics to help you locate your immigrants ancestor's arrival records and explore the many resources available in books, online, and in repositories. 
 
Barbara Mattoon is a genealogist, family historian, world traveler, photographer, amongst many other titles. Washington has been her lifelong home - except for brief sojourns in California, Texas, and Arkansas. Barbara is President of the South King County Genealogical Society. 
 
 


KCLS Event: Coming To America, presented by Barbara Mattoon - Thu, 08/20/2020 6:00pm-7:30pm #cal-reminder

Society@SKCGS.groups.io Calendar <Society@...>
 

Reminder: KCLS Event: Coming To America, presented by Barbara Mattoon

When: Thursday, 20 August 2020, 6:00pm to 7:30pm, (GMT-07:00) America/Los Angeles

Where:Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

View Event

Organizer: King County Library System dyabrown@...

Description:

For adults.

Presented by Barbara Mattoon and South King County Genealogical Society.

The United States has primarily been peopled by immigrants. Locating the records of our ancestors is an important part of our genealogical research. This presentation discusses research tactics to help you locate your immigrants ancestor's arrival records and explore the many resources available in books, online, and in repositories. 
 
Barbara Mattoon is a genealogist, family historian, world traveler, photographer, amongst many other titles. Washington has been her lifelong home - except for brief sojourns in California, Texas, and Arkansas. Barbara is President of the South King County Genealogical Society. 
 
 


SKCGS August + Newly Announced

Valorie Zimmerman
 

PinkFuschias13Aug2020.jpg

🌠 Monday, August 17, 1 – 3 pm PDT: Technology User Group. Data Mining/Web Scraping for Genealogy and Family History Research. For meeting invitations, reminders and discussion, join https://skcgs.groups.io/g/TUG

🔰Just Announced: Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 PDT online, Coming to America 
South King County Genealogical Society President Barbara Mattoon will present Coming to America about how our immigrant ancestors got here, and how to find the records about their journeys. Free and online through the King County Library System Thursday, August 20, 2020 from 6 - 7:30 pm. Registration is required. Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

🌠 Monday, August 24, 1 - 3 pm PDT: Genealogy Chat. Meet up and chat about genealogy subjects and topics. We have no agenda; we just like one another! Click or paste into your browser https://meet.google.com/ncv-hzqk-vig?authuser=0&hs=122 or join by phone: ‪(US) +1 406-686-2783‬ PIN: ‪268 156 108‬#. Join https://skcgs.groups.io/g/Society for invitations, reminders and discussion.

Like: Facebook | Subscribe: Blog | Follow: Twitter | SKCGS.org 

You are receiving this email because you have attended a SKCGS meeting or Genealogy Help Desk and indicated you would like to receive periodic notice of events.  If you would like to be removed from our list, reply with REMOVE in the Subject line.


Genealogy Presenters - Washington State

 

Hello all, I just joined the Virtual Genealogy Society in order to help our own society get better at serving our Members and our south King County communities. 

There is a Facebook group for VGS members in Washington, which is pretty cool. Heather Murphy (https://heathermurphygenealogy.com/) is leading it. She posted a Google Form for people who are willing to present to local societies and says, in part, " If you would like to be added to a list of presenters and have your information shared with groups in Washington, please fill out this form. You do not have to be a professional, we welcome all additions to this list."


All the best,

Valorie



--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Re: Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

Janet Emerson
 

Valorie,

Is this going to be on the Google meet site?

Janet

 

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Valorie Zimmerman
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 7:27 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: [SKCGS] Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

 

You heard it here first!

 

Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

 

Our own Barbara Mattoon will give her newly-updated talk Coming to America about how our immigrant ancestors got here, and how to find the records about their journeys on Thursday, August 20, 2020 from 6 - 7:30 pm. 

 

Word will spread quickly, so register soon. 


South King County Genealogy Society Blog

South King County Genealogy Society Blog <noreply+feedproxy@...>
 

South King County Genealogy Society Blog

From Annoyance to LOVE

Posted: 10 Aug 2020 11:52 AM PDT

FamilySearch and the GPSFamilySearch is indispensable to genealogists, especially those who follow the GPS - Genealogical Proof Standard. As my inspiration for this blog, Devon Noel Lee said in an email to FamilyHistory Fanatics members, 
If you want to be a better genealogist, you have to use the genealogy proof standard. If you want to use the GPS in one central location, there's no better place to do that than FamilySearch.org. 
Genealogical Proof Standard
There are five elements to the Genealogical Proof Standard:
  1. Reasonably exhaustive research has been conducted.
  2. Each statement of fact has a complete and accurate source citation.
  3. The evidence is reliable and has been skillfully correlated and interpreted.
  4. Any contradictory evidence has been resolved.
  5. The conclusion has been soundly reasoned and coherently written.
Any proof statement is subject to re-evaluation when new evidence arises. [1]
 
Reasonably Exhaustive Research
FamilySearch Search menu
Search tab menu

Reasonably exhaustive research must include the millions of documents available on FamilySearch. Diligence requires searching by name, by locality, and in particular collections, even those which are not yet indexed. Use of the FamilySearch Catalog and Research Wiki will lead to online sources outside of FamilySearch, and to records which must be searched offline in libraries, archives and manuscript repositories. 




Complete and Accurate Source Citation
As a bonus, records found on FamilySearch each contain a complete and accurate source citation. To include these citations in the family tree, simply attach these records to the persons named in the record. 

In my case, this record was already attached to me, but I had added no reason statement. In each person profile there is a Sources tab, where each attached or otherwise added Source is listed. Click on the Source and see:


Just below the description is the source citation:
Reason templates
Here comes the sticky part. Every time you make a change in the FamilySearch Family Tree, you are presented with the little "Reason" box. I've been very bad about this, until recently watching a "Members Extra" video from Family History Fanatics called Applying the Genealogy Proof Standard on FamilySearch which has inspired this blog post. Now I'm doing better, because Devon Noel Lee provided some templates for creating reason statements, which makes it so easy! 

Templates are a powerful tool to speed up your work and improve the quality of your research. In fact, by creating and using them you can in part do the final three steps in the GPS: explain how the the evidence is reliable and has been skillfully correlated and interpreted, and that any contradictory evidence has been resolved. And taken all together, that the conclusion has been soundly reasoned and coherently written.
The fundamental reason all this is so inspiring to me is that I want to be a better genealogist, not just so that I can more efficiently research my own family, but also so that I can help others do so. Anything such as these templates that help us do better work and think more analytically about how we do the work is really exciting to me.Marriage
Devon's marriage reason template begins:
Marriage record for ​[groom]​ and​ [bride].​ The record provides evidence of marriage date and place, birth date and place, occupations, and current residence. The record provides parental names of​ [groom’s parents’ names]​ and​ [bride’s parents’ names].[2]
Since my example is just an index record, my statement is now: Marriage record for ​Robert R Zimmerman and​ Valorie A Cowan.​ The record provides evidence of marriage date and place and current residence. 


Once a reason statement is entered, it displays for each person linked to that record, which can be very powerful in the case of an obituary, probate or census record!

Of course many records are more complex than the simple index entry in my example. Here is Devon's example of a compound reason statement:
Marriage record for S B Barton and Nancy A Miller in Franklin County, Ohio. S B Barton is believed to be Samuel Bailey Barton. The couple is in Franklin County, Ohio after their marriage and throughout the rest of their lives. The 1900 US Census placed their marriage around 1886. The Sept. 1885 marriage in the location where they lived the remainder of their lives suggests that this is the right record about this couple.   

The record provides the name of the couple and their marriage date and license date.[2], [3]
I can't directly link to the source of my inspiration since it is members-only, but this video is public: How to Explain How You Solved Your Genealogy Problems on FamilySearch



Birth
Devon's birth template:
Birth record for ​[child's name]​, the ​[son/daughter]​ of ​[parents’ names from the FamilySearch Family Tree]​. The record provides evidence of birth date and place. It includes ​[full or partial]​ parental names as ​[parental names on the record]​.
Add any additional sentences or paragraphs that include:
● Any conflicts between record source, the tree data, and/or other sources.
● Any additional information that might be available but not mentioned in the index
to the record.
○ ‘birth marked as a twin’
○ ‘birth address was St. Ann’s Hospital’. [4]
Merge
Merging​ [Name on the profile that will not survive] [PID],​ who was based on [identify sources and/or relationships], ​into ​[Name on the profile that will survive] [PID], ​who was based on ​[identify sources and/or relationships]​.​ Explain why you chose the profile you did as the surviving one.
Devon's example: 
Merging ​Augusta Beck 9SMF-5ZH,​ who was based on ​her marriage record to Karl Ludwig,​ into ​Augusta Beck LYW1-DSN,​ who was based on ​the 1930 US Census that identified her as the wife of Karl Ludwig and the mother of William and Fred Ludwig as well as her son William's marriage record.
Additionally, the ​Augusta Beck 9SMF-5ZH​ only has the marriage record as a source and her relationship to Karl Ludwig, while the surviving profile has additional sources and relationships.
Census
Here is my Census template so far:

This [year, place] census record has the same birth date and place, and same first name and surname of [name from the FamilySearch Family Tree] as their birth record/other census records. Family members enumerated align with other census records and family obituaries and probate records.


If you have crafted your own templates, please share them with us in the comments. If you are reading this blog in the online group or have subscribed, click on the title and scroll to the bottom to leave your comment.



Valorie Zimmerman


Re: Today's 2020-2021 planning meeting

Janet Stroebel
 

I cannot figure out how to find the shared folder that you are referencing (or actually any folders at all).  Would you please send me the link?

Thanks!


Re: Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

Barbara Nevens
 

Thank you!  I’m looking forward to it.  

On Aug 10, 2020, at 11:39 PM, Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:

Hi Barbara, I didn't mention the time zone because most people coming (I thought) would be local. Sorry for overlooking that! 

We're in Pacific Daylight Time. You can set your Groups.io profile for a different timezone and the calendar should then automatically announce the dates and times in your chosen tz.

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 8:59 PM Barbara Nevens <bnevens@...> wrote:
Time zone?

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 7:27 PM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:
You heard it here first!

Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

Our own Barbara Mattoon will give her newly-updated talk Coming to America about how our immigrant ancestors got here, and how to find the records about their journeys on Thursday, August 20, 2020 from 6 - 7:30 pm. 

Word will spread quickly, so register soon. 



--
Barbara Nevens


Re: Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

 

Hi Barbara, I didn't mention the time zone because most people coming (I thought) would be local. Sorry for overlooking that! 

We're in Pacific Daylight Time. You can set your Groups.io profile for a different timezone and the calendar should then automatically announce the dates and times in your chosen tz.


On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 8:59 PM Barbara Nevens <bnevens@...> wrote:
Time zone?

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 7:27 PM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:
You heard it here first!

Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

Our own Barbara Mattoon will give her newly-updated talk Coming to America about how our immigrant ancestors got here, and how to find the records about their journeys on Thursday, August 20, 2020 from 6 - 7:30 pm. 

Word will spread quickly, so register soon. 



--
Barbara Nevens


Re: Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 

Pacific Daylight Time, thanks for asking


From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Barbara Nevens <bnevens@...>
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 8:18 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm
 
Time zone?

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 7:27 PM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:
You heard it here first!

Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

Our own Barbara Mattoon will give her newly-updated talk Coming to America about how our immigrant ancestors got here, and how to find the records about their journeys on Thursday, August 20, 2020 from 6 - 7:30 pm. 

Word will spread quickly, so register soon. 



--
Barbara Nevens


Re: Just announced: Coming to America, on Thursday, 20 August, 6-7:30 pm

Barbara Nevens
 

Time zone?

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 7:27 PM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:
You heard it here first!

Register here: https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/events/5f2d9a878c81ad450050b78d

Our own Barbara Mattoon will give her newly-updated talk Coming to America about how our immigrant ancestors got here, and how to find the records about their journeys on Thursday, August 20, 2020 from 6 - 7:30 pm. 

Word will spread quickly, so register soon. 



--
Barbara Nevens

2681 - 2700 of 3090