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South King County Genealogy Society Blog

South King County Genealogy Society Blog <noreply+feedproxy@...>
 

South King County Genealogy Society Blog

X, Y and Mitchondrial DNA

Posted: 07 Jun 2020 09:44 PM PDT

It's all about the chromosomes (and mitochondria)
The 23 chromosomes of a human male. Courtesy: National Human Genome Research Institute

X, Y and Mitochondrial DNA are less well-known and not used by many genealogical researchers. Both Y and MtDNA tests are more expensive than the more common autosomal DNA tests. 

X is always tested in an autosomal DNA test. However X results are less reported (FTDNA, 23andMe) or not reported at all (Ancestry, MyHeritage, LivingDNA), with the exception of Gedmatch.

Rather than covering generations of your ancestry, each of these DNA types cover a smaller portion of your tree, which some see as a weakness. However, because of that restriction, the researcher gets a focused result, which can be powerful, if the test will help you answer your research question. 


Y DNA tests were first offered to the consumer in 2000 by only one company: FamilyTreeDNA. Ancestry also offered Y and mitochondrial tests between 2012 and 2014  but not since then. There are other companies now offering Y DNA tests, but none have the genealogy focus of FTDNA. FamilyTreeDNA was also the first to offer mitochondrial DNA tests. Both Y and mtDNA tests are more comprehensive and less expensive than they once were. And FTDNA's autosomal product called FamilyFinder exposes X matches in their chromosome browser, as does 23andMe.


In 2007, 23andMe became the first company to offer autosomal testing, and have since the beginning done some limited testing of the X, Y and mitochondrial DNA, even predicting haplogroups for Y and mt DNA. A haplogroup is a broad grouping of patrilineal or matrilineal DNA which indicate a common origin. 

While one cannot search for X matches in 23andMe, X does show up in the chromosome browser if and only if there is a match on one of the 22 autosomes; the same is true for FTDNA. 

If you and a relative match only on X, that will not show up in FTDNA or 23andMe. However, autosomal test data from any company uploaded to Gedmatch will show X matches and allow X analysis. However, a match only on X could reach back far into the past because of the nature of X chromosome recombination.


X chromosome to the left, tiny Y to the right.
Courtesy: National Human Genome Research Institute
We all have an X chromosomeWomen have two! and men have one, which they get from their mother. Women have one from their mother, and one from their father's mother. If two men match on X, they both know that the match is on their mother's side of their family. It's a bit more nuanced for women.

If X DNA analysis will answer one of your research questions, urge your most likely matches to upload to Gedmatch. 

Men get their Y from their fathers, who got it from their fathersWhy spend all that money to do a Y DNA test? In my case, it focused on what my Dad wanted to know -- his research question -- which was to learn more about his father's Cowans, who came from Selkirkshire Scotland to Upper Canada (now Ontario) in 1832. Scots parish records before the mid-1700s are rare, so Y DNA offers some help, and it was then the only DNA tool available. 

One of my Dad's close matches had a very good tree back to Ireland, and we were able to surmise (but not yet prove) that both of our male lines came from a common ancestor in Stirling, Scotland around the time of the Plantation of Ireland in the early 1600s. 


Every human gets their mitochondrial DNA from their mother
Actual mitochondrial DNA is many time smaller than chromosomal DNA. By National Human Genome Research Institute - National Institutes of Health. National Human Genome Research Institute. “Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms.”Retrieved November 17, 2016, from https://www.genome.gov/glossary/index.cfm?id=129, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=53240683


I already had an autosomal test from 23andMe, so why would I want a mitochondrial test? Because my mother had died before I could test her. My dad had an autosomal test, so I knew that all the parts of my DNA that did not match him came from my mom. Mitochondrial DNA is special in that it follows the mother line and both men and women can test their maternal line. 


I wanted to test DNA that was my mother's alone -- along with her entire mother line. I've always been interested in the maternal line, particularly since I read The Seven Daughters of Eve: The Science That Reveals Our Genetic Ancestry by Bryan Sykes years ago, before consumer testing was available. 

So far, this mtDNA test has not led to any breakthroughs for me. Mitochondrial DNA is extremely stable, and even identical matches can be related through a common ancestor hundreds or even thousands of years in the past. That said, sometimes it is the only test which can support or disprove female parentage


We use DNA tests to answer our research questionsSo how does one use these tests? For all DNA tests, be prepared to do a lot of research on your matches' trees. Most of them do not know how to do the research, and you do. This is as true for your X, Y and mtDNA matches as it is for auDNA matches.

Make one of your trees your "home" tree for all of your DNA matches, and put everyone in one tree. "Build down" so that you can find descendants, and use the tools you have to make the matches and their line easy to find

If you have an auDNA test with Ancestry, I suggest using that as your main genetic tree, although you should always have a backup on your own computer and perhaps in the cloud as well. Place all your matches into that tree, no matter where the match's test is or what type. Tag the match and keep notes about the size of match, their haplogroup, where they tested; whatever you know right there in the tree. 

Not only does your tree enable you to find each of your matches, it is your best advertising to cousin/matches. So put trees everywhere, and refresh them sometimes. You may end up using other tools too, such as spreadsheets. I personally want to be able to see each of the people in a tree rather than just on a spreadsheet. 



If you have Legacy FamilyTree Seminars, I suggest the DNA Foundations series, which is 5 hours of video from Dr. Blaine Bettinger. This will give you an excellent background.

How to use X DNA to answer your research questionThe Foundations series mentioned above covers X briefly, but Which Spot Does X Mark, Anyway? X-DNA Testing in Action by Debra Renard goes into detail. Be sure to download and read the syllabus before watching. Besides that video, which is excellent, I suggest this article by Debbie Parker Wayne from NGS Magazine and:

Inheritance Fan Charts by Dr. Blaine Bettinger:

MS Word tables by Debbie Parker Wayne and Sue Griffith: 

Blogs & Wiki:

Y DNA: your paternal line
Y DNA is a huge subject. Basic to it is that there are two types of consumer test now. The most common test is STR (short tandem repeat) which shows up as a series of numbers which can be compared. More recent is the introduction of so called Big Y, which is an SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) test, in a way akin to autosomal tests. I do not yet understand Big Y, but I won't give up! There is a series of links at https://brouwergenealogy.blogspot.com/p/genetic-genealogy.html which I plan to explore. Some links are dead, unfortunately.

The most important thing to do with Y DNA is join a project or two. Join one for your surname, or includes your surname. Those project admins are your best resource and best source of advice. There are also haplogroup project groups which can be helpful, and some for localities. Do an internet search and another search at FamilyTreeDNA.



You may also choose to upload to MitoYDNA, which is a new project replacing the now-shuttered Ysearch and Mitosearch public databases, which allowed people who tested with other companies to have a place to share their Y and mtDNA data. Read more about it at https://www.yourdnaguide.com/ydgblog/2019/10/3/mitoydna-ydna-mtdna-free-website. There is even a Chrome plugin to make the process almost automatic. 


Mitochondrial DNA: your maternal line
Debbie Parker Wayne has a short article from NGS Magazine here. Then dig in with Roberta Estes: https://dna-explained.com/mitochondrial-dna/ and follow the entire series. Dr. Bettinger's Foundations in DNA series at Legacy also has an hour about mtDNA. 


Advertise!For both Y and Mt DNA, remember to add your haplogroup to your Gedmatch profile. Sometimes a match can be sorted just by comparing a haplogroup! There are other places where you can create a profile, and folks sometimes forget that cousins will search for them, just as we do. You will have a profile at each company you tested with, or have a tree on. Ensure it entices your cousins to get in touch! You can add a custom fact even to FamilySearch Family Tree with the haplogroup of the tested person, and their Gedmatch kit number.

If you use Groups.io, did you realize that you can change your profile per group? For any genealogy group, list your Gedmatch kit number, haplogroups and where you have tested. 

Below is an image of my profile for our Genetic Genealogy/DNA group:



Talent hunt

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 



Re: Another genealogy research mystery novel

rebecca dare
 

Thank you Dorothy -- will do!

On Friday, June 5, 2020, 11:44:42 AM PDT, Dorothy Pretare <dpgen@...> wrote:


Rebecca,

 

Will you pls send an email to  GermanInterestGroupEGS@... & I will send you the info?

Glad to help,

Dorothy

 

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of rebecca dare via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 05, 2020 11:42 AM
To: society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Another genealogy research mystery novel

 

I'd like to attend the German Interest Group webinar at 12:30 but can't find how to get a link so I'll get a notice. Can you help? Thanks, Rebecca

 

On Friday, June 5, 2020, 08:14:45 AM PDT, MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:

 

 

I read it in hardback, in fact it is still in the stack to be returned to the library.  I really enjoyed it and look forward to more by this author.

 

BTW, if you enjoy Sherlock Holmes stories, there are a couple of modern authors who have taken off from the original.  Laurie King has several books with Mary Russell, a young protege of Sherlock.  Leonard Goldberg has written four books, so far, that feature Dr. Watson, his son and Sherlock's daughter.  Lots of fun!

 

MaryLynn


From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2020 10:46 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] Another genealogy research mystery novel

 

Hi folks, today on Roots-l (yep, it still exists! now on groups.io) I heard about this book: Murder Once Removed by S. C. Perkins, and our KCLS has it for Kindle! I'm next in line to get it. :-)

 

The review on KCLS begins, "S.C. Perkins' Murder Once Removed is the captivating first mystery in the Ancestry Detective series, in which Texas genealogist Lucy Lancaster deals with murders in both the past and present." https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2023486082

 

Valorie

 

--

http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her

 


Re: Another genealogy research mystery novel

Dorothy Pretare
 

Rebecca,

 

Will you pls send an email to  GermanInterestGroupEGS@... & I will send you the info?

Glad to help,

Dorothy

 

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of rebecca dare via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 05, 2020 11:42 AM
To: society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Another genealogy research mystery novel

 

I'd like to attend the German Interest Group webinar at 12:30 but can't find how to get a link so I'll get a notice. Can you help? Thanks, Rebecca

 

On Friday, June 5, 2020, 08:14:45 AM PDT, MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:

 

 

I read it in hardback, in fact it is still in the stack to be returned to the library.  I really enjoyed it and look forward to more by this author.

 

BTW, if you enjoy Sherlock Holmes stories, there are a couple of modern authors who have taken off from the original.  Laurie King has several books with Mary Russell, a young protege of Sherlock.  Leonard Goldberg has written four books, so far, that feature Dr. Watson, his son and Sherlock's daughter.  Lots of fun!

 

MaryLynn


From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2020 10:46 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] Another genealogy research mystery novel

 

Hi folks, today on Roots-l (yep, it still exists! now on groups.io) I heard about this book: Murder Once Removed by S. C. Perkins, and our KCLS has it for Kindle! I'm next in line to get it. :-)

 

The review on KCLS begins, "S.C. Perkins' Murder Once Removed is the captivating first mystery in the Ancestry Detective series, in which Texas genealogist Lucy Lancaster deals with murders in both the past and present." https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2023486082

 

Valorie

 

--

http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her

 


Re: Another genealogy research mystery novel

rebecca dare
 

I'd like to attend the German Interest Group webinar at 12:30 but can't find how to get a link so I'll get a notice. Can you help? Thanks, Rebecca

On Friday, June 5, 2020, 08:14:45 AM PDT, MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:


I read it in hardback, in fact it is still in the stack to be returned to the library.  I really enjoyed it and look forward to more by this author.

BTW, if you enjoy Sherlock Holmes stories, there are a couple of modern authors who have taken off from the original.  Laurie King has several books with Mary Russell, a young protege of Sherlock.  Leonard Goldberg has written four books, so far, that feature Dr. Watson, his son and Sherlock's daughter.  Lots of fun!

MaryLynn

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2020 10:46 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] Another genealogy research mystery novel
 
Hi folks, today on Roots-l (yep, it still exists! now on groups.io) I heard about this book: Murder Once Removed by S. C. Perkins, and our KCLS has it for Kindle! I'm next in line to get it. :-)

The review on KCLS begins, "S.C. Perkins' Murder Once Removed is the captivating first mystery in the Ancestry Detective series, in which Texas genealogist Lucy Lancaster deals with murders in both the past and present." https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2023486082

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Re: Another genealogy research mystery novel

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 

I read it in hardback, in fact it is still in the stack to be returned to the library.  I really enjoyed it and look forward to more by this author.

BTW, if you enjoy Sherlock Holmes stories, there are a couple of modern authors who have taken off from the original.  Laurie King has several books with Mary Russell, a young protege of Sherlock.  Leonard Goldberg has written four books, so far, that feature Dr. Watson, his son and Sherlock's daughter.  Lots of fun!

MaryLynn

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 4, 2020 10:46 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] Another genealogy research mystery novel
 
Hi folks, today on Roots-l (yep, it still exists! now on groups.io) I heard about this book: Murder Once Removed by S. C. Perkins, and our KCLS has it for Kindle! I'm next in line to get it. :-)

The review on KCLS begins, "S.C. Perkins' Murder Once Removed is the captivating first mystery in the Ancestry Detective series, in which Texas genealogist Lucy Lancaster deals with murders in both the past and present." https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2023486082

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Another genealogy research mystery novel

 

Hi folks, today on Roots-l (yep, it still exists! now on groups.io) I heard about this book: Murder Once Removed by S. C. Perkins, and our KCLS has it for Kindle! I'm next in line to get it. :-)

The review on KCLS begins, "S.C. Perkins' Murder Once Removed is the captivating first mystery in the Ancestry Detective series, in which Texas genealogist Lucy Lancaster deals with murders in both the past and present." https://kcls.bibliocommons.com/item/show/2023486082

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



South King County Genealogy Society Blog

South King County Genealogy Society Blog <noreply+feedproxy@...>
 

South King County Genealogy Society Blog

Where We Have Been and Where We Are Going

Posted: 01 Jun 2020 02:04 PM PDT

Where We Have Been


Back in February 2020, we at SKCGS were proud of ourselves because we had moved our newsletter from a quarterly print publication mailed to our members and friends, to a weekly blog posted on our website and emailed to members and friends.  We had taken the unprecedented step of accepting credit card payments online!

Where We Are

On March 1, news that the novel Corona virus, which up until then was something we had read about or seen a news story about on TV in Wuhan, China, suddenly was here, in our country, in King County, in Kirkland, for heaven’s sake.  Just to be safe, the March Board and General Meetings were canceled.  Surely this would be under control in just a short time!  At about this time, our wise members, Valorie Zimmerman and MaryLynn Strickland realized that our members were not comfortable attending in-person meetings and began investigating online meeting options.

An online platform was selected, and with some trepidation, the DNA Special Interest Group scheduled and launched our first online meeting.  Despite a few technical hiccups, it was a great success.  The participants loved it!  The Technical Users Group meeting, April Board Meeting, and April General Membership meeting followed.

What We Have Learned

Virtual meetings are convenient.  It is not necessary to drive through nasty traffic or bad weather to attend a meeting.  Participants arrive relaxed and ready to contribute.  The time saved in not getting ready and commuting is time we can spend doing genealogy.

Virtual meetings are “green”.  Air pollution has declined significantly worldwide since the pandemic began. We are doing our part to reduce the use of fossil fuels and clear the air.  That will benefit the health of all of us. 

Audiences are comfortable and more participatory in the digital space.  Members we have not seen at in-person meetings for some time because their situation made it impossible or inconvenient, are attending and participating in virtual meetings.  People who have never attended an SKCGS in-person meeting are attending and participating.  We anticipate that when we can resume meeting in-person, some or many of these people will attend and engage with us because a relationship has already been established.  We are already friends. 

We are engaging, sharing, and learning more about genealogy in this more relaxed environment.  When we are not lined up in straight rows where we can only talk with those on either side of us, or under time pressure to clear the room so that the next group can get in, more meaningful conversations can take place.  We see this in the Genealogy Chat Group that has met several times.

Membership may increase.  Already, several of the people we first met in an online meeting have joined our society.

No longer are we restricted to speakers within a reasonable commuting distance of our meeting location.  This will expand the number and variety of programs we can offer to our membership. 

What Is The Downside

A virtual meeting does not provide the fellowship of in-person interaction.  Some of our members are isolated and lack the warmth of face-to-face interaction. For that reason, if nothing else, I look forward to the day when we can gather together again.
 
Not everyone has the technical ability or the availability of equipment to participate in virtual meetings.  Hopefully, when it is safe to do so, we can provide technical support to those who want it. 

Where Are We Going

As MaryLynn says, “We have stumbled into the future”.

I believe we need to add the capability to record meetings and presentations to make them available to a wider audience.  We are restricting ourselves to those who can attend daytime meetings by having Special Interest Groups only during weekday hours.  Many younger people cannot participate during those hours due to family or career responsibilities.
 
We need your input.  What can we do to make the Society more valuable to you? 

We also need your help.  Please consider stepping up to help with publicity and communications, coordination of education and programming, help with the website and coordination of educational outreach opportunities. 
Please respond in the comments or contact me at president@.... 

Image courtesy of Pixabay
Remember: smile.amazon.com
            


Best Wishes,                                         
Barbara Mattoon
President SKCGS





Re: Mining older videos, webinars

rebecca dare
 

On Monday, June 1, 2020, 12:58:53 AM PDT, Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:


On Sun, May 31, 2020 at 3:30 PM Valorie Zimmerman via groups.io <valorie.zimmerman=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all, preparing for the next GG/DNA meeting, I've been scouring for resources for attendees, and stumbled across some great old stuff. For instance, keynote addresses are often deadly boring, in my experience. But just watch this one from CeCe Moore, from 2018: 2017 i4GG Keynote: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkrsFseu7b4. Absolutely fabulous review of the growth of the industry up to 2018. I had forgotten and didn't know part of this -- and there have been new developments. In addition, some really important issues about genetic genealogy credentialing are discussed.

Crista Cowan did a nice series on the GPS (Genealogical Proof Standard) in 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfR2yLsXu88

I've now watched the second of this series, Reasonably exhaustive search, which is very much from an Ancestry.com POV. Still, very useful. And I had not heard about the Miriam Weiner Eastern European Archival Database, available on Ancestry.com, and which points to *offline* sources. https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1597/ . So, useful and only about 25 minutes long.

And Blaine Bettinger has a 5-part Foundations of DNA on Legacy: https://familytreewebinars.com/. Membership is necessary to watch these.

I just re-watched the second in this series, which is an DNA Overview. He stresses the difference betweeen your *genealogical* tree, which contains all your ancestors, and your DNA tree, which contains only the ancestors from whom you inherited DNA -- and that is not all of them. This is especially obvious in X and Y inheritance, which we will cover at the GG/DNA group on June 8th.

Also I found another great resource for mitochondrial DNA on Roberta Estes blog: https://dna-explained.com/mitochondrial-dna/

Please reply if you find any of these useful, and share your own finds!

Valorie


Re: Mining older videos, webinars

 

On Sun, May 31, 2020 at 3:30 PM Valorie Zimmerman via groups.io <valorie.zimmerman=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all, preparing for the next GG/DNA meeting, I've been scouring for resources for attendees, and stumbled across some great old stuff. For instance, keynote addresses are often deadly boring, in my experience. But just watch this one from CeCe Moore, from 2018: 2017 i4GG Keynote: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkrsFseu7b4. Absolutely fabulous review of the growth of the industry up to 2018. I had forgotten and didn't know part of this -- and there have been new developments. In addition, some really important issues about genetic genealogy credentialing are discussed.

Crista Cowan did a nice series on the GPS (Genealogical Proof Standard) in 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfR2yLsXu88

I've now watched the second of this series, Reasonably exhaustive search, which is very much from an Ancestry.com POV. Still, very useful. And I had not heard about the Miriam Weiner Eastern European Archival Database, available on Ancestry.com, and which points to *offline* sources. https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1597/ . So, useful and only about 25 minutes long.

And Blaine Bettinger has a 5-part Foundations of DNA on Legacy: https://familytreewebinars.com/. Membership is necessary to watch these.

I just re-watched the second in this series, which is an DNA Overview. He stresses the difference betweeen your *genealogical* tree, which contains all your ancestors, and your DNA tree, which contains only the ancestors from whom you inherited DNA -- and that is not all of them. This is especially obvious in X and Y inheritance, which we will cover at the GG/DNA group on June 8th.

Also I found another great resource for mitochondrial DNA on Roberta Estes blog: https://dna-explained.com/mitochondrial-dna/

Please reply if you find any of these useful, and share your own finds!

Valorie


Mining older videos, webinars

 

Hi all, preparing for the next GG/DNA meeting, I've been scouring for resources for attendees, and stumbled across some great old stuff. For instance, keynote addresses are often deadly boring, in my experience. But just watch this one from CeCe Moore, from 2018: 2017 i4GG Keynote: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hkrsFseu7b4. Absolutely fabulous review of the growth of the industry up to 2018. I had forgotten and didn't know part of this -- and there have been new developments. In addition, some really important issues about genetic genealogy credentialing are discussed.

Crista Cowan did a nice series on the GPS (Genealogical Proof Standard) in 2014: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfR2yLsXu88

And Blaine Bettinger has a 5-part Foundations of DNA on Legacy: https://familytreewebinars.com/. Membership is necessary to watch these.

Please reply if you find any of these useful, and share your own finds!

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



"On Its 20th Anniversary, DNA Testing Reaches a Tipping Point"

 

Great article in Psychology Today by author Libby Copeland, the author of the new book "The Lost Family" : 


I have the book on hold with my library, whenever they can reopen.

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



New Gmail Tools to Help with Genealogy Tasks and Correspondence

 

Found today on #Genealogy #Twitter #LegacyFamilyTree

New Gmail Tools to Help with Genealogy Tasks and Correspondence:


GFO's coming free Genealogy Talks

 

See more about these webinars at https://gfo.org/learn/gen-talks.html

I hope to "attend" at least some of these talks, which seem not be be available later.

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Updated Event: Membership Meeting :: Social time 9:30 am - Program 10 am - Saturday, 20 June 2020 #cal-invite

Society@SKCGS.groups.io Calendar <Society@...>
 

Membership Meeting :: Social time 9:30 am - Program 10 am

When:
Saturday, 20 June 2020
9:30am to 12:00pm
(UTC-07:00) America/Los Angeles

Organizer: Education Committee education@... 253-740-2725; text me if you need help getting into the meeting

Description:
Jill Morelli presents "Family Search: The Other 70%”.

Click or paste into your browser: https://meet.google.com/hya-ppeu-jma?authuser=0&hs=122 or call in: +1 470-328-5254‬ PIN: ‪794 507 609‬#


SKCGS June events

Valorie Zimmerman
 


MemorialDayAzalias.jpg

🌟 This past week has been sobering, between Memorial Day and the sad death toll our country is enduring. I hope that your genealogy research is comforting and informing your life. While the pandemic continues, we will not meet in person. Those who have attended our online meetings have enjoyed them, and we hope to continue some of them even when we can once again meet in person. If the timing is good, and the topic interests, we hope you will join us. 

📠 If you are doing some of your shopping on Amazon.com these days, consider using instead https://smile.amazon.com/ and designating South King County Genealogy Society as your charity of choice. The cost to you is the same and Amazon.com gives us a small percentage of each sale. Every little bit counts! Thank you.

🌠 Tuesday, June 2, 6:30 pm, SKCGS Board meeting. If you would like to join, please write to Board@... and ask for an invitation.

🌠 Friday, June 5, 2020, 12:30-2:30 pm our friends in the German Interest Group of Eastside GS will be meeting online. Some Resources for Pennsylvania German Research will be presented by Joe Flint. More details at https://egsgermangroup.wordpress.com/meetings/

🌠 Monday, June 8, 1-3 pm, Genetic Genealogy/DNA Interest Group will discuss X, Y and Mitochondrial DNA. Join https://skcgs.groups.io/g/Genetic-Genealogy to get meeting invitations and research tips. 

🌠🌠  Saturday, June 20th, 9:30 am Social time; 10 am General Membership Meeting. Jill Morelli will present Family Search: The Other 70%. Click or paste the link to join: https://meet.google.com/hya-ppeu-jma?hs=122&authuser=0 or call: +1 470-328-5254‬ PIN: ‪794 507 609‬#

🌠 Monday, June 22nd, 1-3 pm, Technology User Group (TUG) will discuss Planning Your Research Trip. Join https://skcgs.groups.io/g/TUG to get meeting invitations and research tips.

🌠 Monday, June 29th, 1-3 pm, Genealogy Chat. There is no agenda; we just meet and chat because we like one another, and enjoy helping one another. Invite your genealogy buddies if they don't attend yet! Click or paste into your browser: https://meet.google.com/mfm-ermp-ohh?hs=122&authuser=0


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Re: Things to consider while you are staying safe

gvm98042@...
 

Marilynn,  I am flooded by political emails because I donated. Add SKCGS blog and I cannot deal with the volume of emails right now. I am going to unsubscribe and subscribe at a later date.  Thanks.
Guy

On Tue, May 19, 2020 at 4:22 PM MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:
SKCGS has had several virtual meetings recently and everyone seems happy to see each other!  As we are getting better acquainted with each other there are some things to consider.  This society, as with any other non-profit, runs on the volunteer efforts of its members.  Many of the tasks that keep it running smoothly may not be readily evident until there is a break in the system.  We have been so fortunate that when there is a break, others step in.  Now some people are handling extra responsibilities; others have health or family concerns.

We have lots of volunteer opportunities; can you make one of them right for you?

HELP WANTED--Do you have an hour or two available for the good of SKCGS?

What kind of person are you?

 You're a secret gossip (in a positive way)—you like to share good news, especially about coming events

You are a CPA (Cut and Paste Artist)—you have mastered the art of Highlight, Ctrl + C, Ctrl + V

Your skills would be valuable to the Publicity Committee


What kind of person are you?

You like looking at blogs, webinars and other resources to learn what is new in genealogy

You could work with like-minded members to develop programs for general meetings and special interest groups

If you meet these qualifications, you would be a big help on the Education Committee


What kind of person are you?

You like promoting SKCGS in the community at library help desks and answering inquiries from the website

Help to grow the membership and research interests within the group

If you meet these qualifications, you could fit nicely into the Outreach Committee


What kind of person are you?

You like a place for everything and everything in its place

You love books, especially new releases, and have a wish list of things you'd like to read

If you meet these qualifications, there's room for you in the Resource Committee


No need to crowd!  Choose one that fits you and reply to this message.  We can use more than one person in each position so there's opportunity for everyone to volunteer!  


South King County Genealogy Society Blog

South King County Genealogy Society Blog <noreply+feedproxy@...>
 

South King County Genealogy Society Blog

Ethical Genealogy

Posted: 25 May 2020 10:00 AM PDT

Have you heard of the new book by journalist Libby Copeland: The Lost Family: How DNA Testing is Upending Who We Are. American Ancestors and the Boston Public Library had an interview and Q & A with her this week, full of stories and insight.

I was struck by the advice from one of the "search angels" in her book, who says that she no longer tries to persuade people to DNA test. After hearing Judy Russell's webinar DNA Rights and Wrongs: The Ethical Side of Testing, I think I would have to agree. To our cousins or others we would like to test, we owe a complete description of what testing entails, and we need to offer them fine-grained choices such as: 
  • whether their profile will have their name or an anonymised nickname,
  • what email will be associated with a kit,
  • whether or not they will allow sharing of the test results, and to whom,
  • whether or not they want to access the test results,
  • if there are unexpected results, do they want to know those results? and so much more.

On her blog Forming Consent, Judy Russell offers some help to us as we discuss and assess these choices. First, the Board for Certification of Genealogists offer the Genealogists' Code of Ethicshttps://bcgcertification.org/ethics-standards/code/. In my opinion, every genealogist should read and consider carefully this code, whether or not you plan to certify with BCG. You can download a copy of the code at the bottom of the page.

To get specific about DNA testing, there is the Genetic Genealogy Standards, drawn up by many leaders in the field, such as CeCe Moore, Blaine Bettinger, Angie Bush, Ann Turner and Debbie Parker Wayne, to name a few with whom I am familiar. Again, the standard is available to download from the site.

Blaine T. Bettinger has provided freely a checklist you can provide to your prospective test-taker to clarify their preferences. I personally would add a question about allowing (or not) access to kit results by law enforcement. Judy Russell's blog post also links to Beneficiary Designation Form by Bettinger, a Consent Form for a Project by Debbie Parker Wayne and a  Consent Form for a Family Member also by Wayne. Depending on your research plan, any or all of these could be useful to you.

You might want to read more about informed consent at Before we buy that kit…

By the way, I've not yet read The Lost Family. I have asked the King County Library system to buy a copy.

Valorie Zimmerman


Blogs Why should I have one?

tjb001ster@...
 

I found my first blog post on Page 4 in this KCGS Newsletter published by Janet Camarata. It was fun to read it again and things I would like my Children and Grandchildren to carry on.


https://www.evernote.com/shard/s352/u/0/res/ef1e248d-4b38-46f3-9b12-35cc82fe020d/2016__Jul_Kittitas_Kinfolk.pdf


Genealogy Chat - Fri, 05/22/2020 #cal-notice

Society@SKCGS.groups.io Calendar <noreply@...>
 

Genealogy Chat

When:
Friday, 22 May 2020
1:00pm to 2:00pm
(GMT-07:00) America/Los Angeles

Where:
https://meet.google.com/yoi-ojxf-xnx?hs=122&authuser=0

Organizer:
SKCGS@groups.io 253-740-2725 (text or call)

Description:
Genealogy chat - bring questions, answers, books, new resources, new-found cousins, ancestors or stories.

Warning: after an hour, we may veer off-topic!

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