Date   
Re: Reference books

 

Oh that's super! When you do get over there it looks like there is lots to see, according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Register_of_Historic_Places_listings_in_Adams_County,_Washington

Last time I drove over that way, we went through the Palouse and it was *wonderful!*

Valorie

On Wed, Aug 5, 2020 at 5:49 PM J & T Arnold <blackhrn@...> wrote:

 

 

Thank you!   I didn’t realize that they have a cemetery and didn’t even think to look at the Find-a-grave site (even though I’m on the site often)!!    Now I need to find time to head that way and find it. 😊 

 

Tracy

 

From: Valorie Zimmerman
Sent: Wednesday, August 5, 2020 4:33 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Reference books

 

And I just came across this question too. Sorry for the delay in answering!

 

On Sun, Apr 26, 2020 at 1:16 PM J & T Arnold <blackhrn@...> wrote:

Historical Atlas of Washington and Oregon question

 

Any information on the city of Delight, Washington??

 

Thanks!

 

Tracy Case Arnold

 

No mention of Delight, Washington. What a great name for a town! A quick Google search found a cemetery there: https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/76756/delight-cemetery

 

Valorie

 

::snip old::

Re: Reference books

J & T Arnold
 

 

 

Thank you!   I didn’t realize that they have a cemetery and didn’t even think to look at the Find-a-grave site (even though I’m on the site often)!!    Now I need to find time to head that way and find it. 😊 

 

Tracy

 

From: Valorie Zimmerman
Sent: Wednesday, August 5, 2020 4:33 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Reference books

 

And I just came across this question too. Sorry for the delay in answering!

 

On Sun, Apr 26, 2020 at 1:16 PM J & T Arnold <blackhrn@...> wrote:

Historical Atlas of Washington and Oregon question

 

Any information on the city of Delight, Washington??

 

Thanks!

 

Tracy Case Arnold

 

No mention of Delight, Washington. What a great name for a town! A quick Google search found a cemetery there: https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/76756/delight-cemetery

 

Valorie

 

::snip old::

 

Re: Reference books

 

And I just came across this question too. Sorry for the delay in answering!

On Sun, Apr 26, 2020 at 1:16 PM J & T Arnold <blackhrn@...> wrote:

Historical Atlas of Washington and Oregon question

 

Any information on the city of Delight, Washington??

 

Thanks!

 

Tracy Case Arnold


No mention of Delight, Washington. What a great name for a town! A quick Google search found a cemetery there: https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/76756/delight-cemetery

Valorie

::snip old::

Re: Reference books

 

Hi Bob, while searching for something else, I came across this question of yours I never answered -- from months ago. 

On Sun, Apr 26, 2020 at 2:07 PM Bob Burton <rrburton1@...> wrote:
Any info regarding the founding of the town of Harlan, Oregon circa 1800 in the Washington - Oregon atlas?  It’s located about 40 miles west of Corvallis.  Thanks!
Bob Burton 

There is Harney in the Atlas but no Harlan, sorry. Wikipedia has a page about it with a lot of links to other info though: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harlan,_Oregon

Hope this helps,

Valorie

Re: Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 

And to think that 70+ years later we were neighbors!  In parts of Wyoming and Montana your closest neighbor may be several miles away.

I love the story of your father playing basketball there.  It helps to humanize the location.


From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Trish Sowards <trishseaward@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2020 10:49 AM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours
 
My story was just a historical and genealogical tidbit about family who lived nearby.

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 10:00 AM MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:
My story regarding Heart Mountain was simply the struggle of a man providing for his family.  In the fall of 1948 my father found work in Cody and moved us from Laurel, Montana.  We stayed in a small motel room for a couple of weeks while my father looked for somewhere for us to live.  I was six years old, in the first grade.  My sister was about 20 months old.

Housing was scarce and finally we found a building a few miles outside of town where we could live.  I remember that there were two long, narrow tarpaper laden buildings.  My mother wadded up rags and newspaper to stuff between the cracks in the interior boards.  Then we hung blankets on the interior walls to further insulate against the cold.  There was no electricity; we used a kerosene lantern.  I don't remember if the stove was for wood or coal but either would have been precious commodities.  And there was no running water.

The snow was so deep that my father had to walk down the hill breaking a trail for me to get to the school bus.  I dutifully had the mumps during Christmas break so I didn't miss any school.  And my father went hunting for rabbits or any other small game on that bleak hillside.  My six year old brain absorbed those images but I don't remember knowing the significance of the place at that time.

Fast forward what seemed a lifetime but was only six years to my eighth grade Wyoming History class and a picture of the barracks at Heart Mountain in my textbook.  I recognized the buildings in which we had lived for that few months during one of the coldest winters of my life.  My connection to the place is so minimal compared to its overall importance.  I am so happy to see the progress and support for the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center so that we may never forget.

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Trish Sowards <trishseaward@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2020 9:20 AM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours
 
I was surprised to see Heart Mountain as well.  It was a few miles from my grandfather's farm.  My father said his father was the only person he ever heard say he didn't believe it was constitutional.  My father used to go to Heart Mountain when he was on leave from the Navy and play basketball with the young men who had to visit their families locked up there when they were on leave from the service.  Certainly a shameful episode in our history.  (I lived nearby from 1986 to 1981.  The chill factor actually got down to 80 below one winter.)

On Wed, Jul 29, 2020 at 9:45 PM Carol Larson via groups.io <Larsonjw=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
MaryLynn, there must have been an interesting story about your winter at Heart Mountain.  
This was an interesting list and none of my ancestors were ever at any of these.  Ellis Island yes, Chimney Rock on the Oregon Trail yes, Northern Neck Land Grants yes and lots of Oregon Land Donation Claims yes,  but no one ever connected with the tourist destinations we visit today.  Carol  


On Jul 29, 2020, at 8:07 PM, MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:


I was not too surprised to find one of the sites does indeed have a connection with my ancestors.  Stow, Massachusetts is named for John Stow, my original immigrant.

I was, however, very surprised to see Heart Mountain Interpretive Center listed.  When I was in first grade, my parents, my sister and I lived in one of those barracks from December 1948 through February 1949, a very cold winter.

MaryLynn

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Dorothy Pretare <dpgen@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2020 7:33 PM
To: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours
 

Your ancestors may have a connection with one of the historic sites visited, and there is a short preview video for each that you can watch now.

 

America’s Summer Roadtrip

Saturday, August 1, 2020, and visit 12 Historic sites in 12 Hours. Free.

For more information and sign up:  https://www.americassummerroadtrip.org/

 

 

Murder and Mayhem and more!

 

While checking out the latest Conference Keeper email (if you don't yet get it, you should!) and registering for a webinar offered by the Toronto GS, I looked at the Webinar tab on their website <https://torontofamilyhistory.org/toronto-branch/meetings/webinars/>, and saw:

Murder and Mayhem
Settlers and Sinners
Colonists and Criminals -- More Thrilling Stories from New France.

I watched it last night to see if it's as exciting as the title promises, and it was *great* and the handout is fabulous if you have any French Canadian ancestry.

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her


South King County Genealogy Society Blog

South King County Genealogy Society Blog <noreply+feedproxy@...>
 

South King County Genealogy Society Blog

When Life Gives You Lemons . . .

Posted: 03 Aug 2020 10:01 AM PDT


          


Options

Make Lemonade; or so the adage goes.  My response would be . . .lemon meringue pie!  No, wait, I would make Lemon Sponge Cake Pie!  This was my father’s favorite pie and my mother’s go-to dessert for any special occasion.  I don’t remember ever seeing it in a recipe book; Mom had it memorized and I made sure to put it in my collection of favorite recipes when I moved out on my own.  (I’ve got to find that old red steno pad.)

In 1999, when I moved my mother from Wyoming to live with my sister in Georgia, Mom gave me what she said was her mother’s cookbook.  It was an old, hardbound farm implement catalog from 1887 with newspaper clipping recipes glued on the pages.  One clipping had the location of Sweetbrier Farm, April 11, 1886.





Clues

As I looked at it more closely a few years later, with some genealogy research experience under my belt, I realized it might have belonged to an earlier generation.  My great grandmother Katherine Kinnie had been a cook for a family in Ontario, Canada, and in 1881, when the family immigrated to the US through Dakota Territory, she and her two daughters came with them.



In that collection of clippings I found two very similar versions of Lemon Sponge Pie.  The pie is a single crust with a light, airy filling that is so refreshing!  During baking the filling separates into two layers with the lighter sponge on top and the denser lemon curd below.  I have never found this pie or anything similar in any cookbook. . . .






Down the rabbit hole

. . . Until I did a Google search for vintage lemon recipes.  I found dozens of pictures and recipes for the pie with various titles—Old Fashioned Amish Lemon Sponge Pie, Pennsylvania Dutch Lemon Sponge Pie or just Lemon Sponge Pie.  The only differences were the number of eggs and the oven temperature.  Among comments about the recipes was someone who grew up near Lancaster, Pennsylvania and went to the Amish and Mennonite Fairs.  Every booth with baked goods had Lemon Sponge Pies for sale; it was a staple commodity.

That raised the question of how my mother was so familiar with it.  My family was not from Pennsylvania or anywhere near the Amish.  It probably came via my maternal grandmother or great grandmother who were from Canada.  Then I remembered the Mennonite and Hutterite communities in the western prairie states including the Dakotas.  I found a modern-day Mennonite Church a few miles south of Pembina where my immigrants lived in the 1880s.  A search in the local newspaper, The Pioneer Express, told of common interaction between the Mennonite community in northeast Dakota Territory and communities on the other side of the border in Manitoba in the 1880s.



12 noon already?

Where has the morning gone?  Or, where have I gone this morning?  I’ve been to the Library of Congress looking at old newspapers at Chronicling America and I've been to the Family Search library to read histories of communities in Pembina and Walsh counties, Dakota Territory.  I’ve gotten a deeper feeling of the social and ethnic atmosphere in which they lived.  It was not an aspect I would have thought to explore and only came about with a trip down a rabbit hole, seeking a simple pie recipe.


Blog Comments

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 

Hi everybody;

My topic is Blog Comments, or rather, Lack of Blog Comments.  It is very easy to access the Comment Box at the bottom of the blog and authors would really appreciate seeing your response to their efforts. 

If you receive the current blog via email from this group, you can access the web page version of the blog:

Clicking on this line takes you to a reduced version of the webpage where you can leave a comment.
South King County Genealogy Society Blog

The Eternal Question

Posted: 27 Jul 2020 10:00 AM PDT

What Will Happen To My Research?

 Or click on the title of the blog and it opens the entire blog where you can do the same.  

Please use this means to let us know what you are thinking so we can stay current and help you do the same.  Thank you from your blog contributors.

August with South King County Genealogical Society

Valorie Zimmerman
 


July202petunias.jpg

🌟 Saturday, August 8, 10 - 11:30, 1 - 3 pm: SKCGS Annual Planning Meeting; all members welcome. Click or paste in your browser https://meet.google.com/bdv-stsr-uic?authuser=0&hs=122 or join by phone: (US) +1 530-675-4394‬ PIN: ‪712 179 883‬#. Join https://skcgs.groups.io/g/Society for invitations, reminders and discussion.

🌠 Monday, August 10, 1 – 3 pm: Genetic Genealogy/DNA Interest Group. DNA Catch-Up: Share Useful Techniques and Tips To Use DNA for Genealogy. For meeting invitations, reminders and discussion, join https://skcgs.groups.io/g/Genetic-Genealogy

🌠 Monday, August 17, 1 – 3 pm: Technology User Group. Data Mining/Web Scraping for Genealogy and Family History Research. For meeting invitations, reminders and discussion, join https://skcgs.groups.io/g/TUG

🌠 Monday, August 24, 1 - 3 pm: Genealogy Chat. Meet up and chat about genealogy subjects and topics. We have no agenda; we just like one another! Click or paste into your browser https://meet.google.com/ncv-hzqk-vig?authuser=0&hs=122 or join by phone: ‪(US) +1 406-686-2783‬ PIN: ‪268 156 108‬#. Join https://skcgs.groups.io/g/Society for invitations, reminders and discussion.

Like: Facebook | Subscribe: Blog | Follow: Twitter | SKCGS.org 

You are receiving this email because you have attended a SKCGS meeting or Genealogy Help Desk and indicated you would like to receive periodic notice of events.  If you would like to be removed from our list, reply with REMOVE in the Subject line.

Re: Ancestry Traits

Rich Thayer
 

On the DNA Results Summary page, the word ’traits’ does not show up.  However, at the bottom of the page is a link to buy tests for additional family members.  Go to it and the Traits add-on is available.  Everything pointed to the summary page, but in typical ancestry fashion you are made to search for something that should be obvious, especially as it nets them more money.  Thanks for the help.

On Aug 1, 2020, at 11:03 AM, MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:

Rich, at your DNA menu, choose "Your DNA Results Summary" ;  you'll be able to see more about the traits portion.  Also check in Settings on that same page.

ML

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Rich Thayer <aseriesguy@...>
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 10:56 AM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Ancestry Traits
 
I do have a DNA kit with Ancestry.  However, Traits does not show up in my DNA menu.  I can sign into my sister’s account and Traits does show up in her DNA menu.

> On Aug 1, 2020, at 8:36 AM, Michele Mattoon <emmattoon@...> wrote:
> 
> I use it. I have a subscription, so it may not be the same for you, but you click on DNA on the top Ancestry menu and click on "traits". That takes you into the page that explains everything. This is assuming you have your DNA with Ancestry, and there is no extra cost.
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rich Thayer
> Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 10:24 PM
> To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
> Subject: [SKCGS] Ancestry Traits
> 
> Has anybody signed up for Ancestry’s DNA Traits?  I have had an invite, but have found nothing as to how to turn it on or buy that extra.  Note that I have an account, BUT NOT a subscription.
> 
> Rich Thayer
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 





Re: Ancestry Traits

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 

Rich, at your DNA menu, choose "Your DNA Results Summary" ;  you'll be able to see more about the traits portion.  Also check in Settings on that same page.

ML


From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Rich Thayer <aseriesguy@...>
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 10:56 AM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Ancestry Traits
 
I do have a DNA kit with Ancestry.  However, Traits does not show up in my DNA menu.  I can sign into my sister’s account and Traits does show up in her DNA menu.

> On Aug 1, 2020, at 8:36 AM, Michele Mattoon <emmattoon@...> wrote:
>
> I use it. I have a subscription, so it may not be the same for you, but you click on DNA on the top Ancestry menu and click on "traits". That takes you into the page that explains everything. This is assuming you have your DNA with Ancestry, and there is no extra cost.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rich Thayer
> Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 10:24 PM
> To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
> Subject: [SKCGS] Ancestry Traits
>
> Has anybody signed up for Ancestry’s DNA Traits?  I have had an invite, but have found nothing as to how to turn it on or buy that extra.  Note that I have an account, BUT NOT a subscription.
>
> Rich Thayer
>
>
>
>
>
>




Re: Ancestry Traits

Michele Mattoon
 

Try this link: https://support.ancestry.com/s/article/Frequently-Asked-Questions-About-AncestryDNA-Traits I guess I must have purchased them, but don't remember any details.

-----Original Message-----
From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rich Thayer
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 10:56 AM
To: Society@SKCGS.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Ancestry Traits

I do have a DNA kit with Ancestry. However, Traits does not show up in my DNA menu. I can sign into my sister’s account and Traits does show up in her DNA menu.

On Aug 1, 2020, at 8:36 AM, Michele Mattoon <emmattoon@...> wrote:

I use it. I have a subscription, so it may not be the same for you, but you click on DNA on the top Ancestry menu and click on "traits". That takes you into the page that explains everything. This is assuming you have your DNA with Ancestry, and there is no extra cost.

-----Original Message-----
From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rich Thayer
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 10:24 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: [SKCGS] Ancestry Traits

Has anybody signed up for Ancestry’s DNA Traits? I have had an invite, but have found nothing as to how to turn it on or buy that extra. Note that I have an account, BUT NOT a subscription.

Rich Thayer





Re: Ancestry Traits

Rich Thayer
 

I do have a DNA kit with Ancestry. However, Traits does not show up in my DNA menu. I can sign into my sister’s account and Traits does show up in her DNA menu.

On Aug 1, 2020, at 8:36 AM, Michele Mattoon <emmattoon@...> wrote:

I use it. I have a subscription, so it may not be the same for you, but you click on DNA on the top Ancestry menu and click on "traits". That takes you into the page that explains everything. This is assuming you have your DNA with Ancestry, and there is no extra cost.

-----Original Message-----
From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rich Thayer
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 10:24 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: [SKCGS] Ancestry Traits

Has anybody signed up for Ancestry’s DNA Traits? I have had an invite, but have found nothing as to how to turn it on or buy that extra. Note that I have an account, BUT NOT a subscription.

Rich Thayer





Annual Planning Meeting - Sat, 08/08/2020 10:00am-3:00pm #cal-reminder

Society@SKCGS.groups.io Calendar <Society@...>
 

Reminder: Annual Planning Meeting

When: Saturday, 8 August 2020, 10:00am to 3:00pm, (GMT-07:00) America/Los Angeles

Where:https://meet.google.com/bdv-stsr-uic?authuser=0&hs=122

View Event

Organizer: SKCGS Board Board@...

Description: Virtual Annual Planning Meeting

All members are welcome. We'll convene at 10 am and break for lunch at 11:30.

The afternoon session will begin at 1 pm.

Click or paste into your browser: https://meet.google.com/bdv-stsr-uic?authuser=0&hs=122 . The same link will work morning and afternoon. Join by phone: ‪(US) +1 530-675-4394‬ PIN: ‪712 179 883‬#

 

Re: Ancestry Traits

Michele Mattoon
 

I use it. I have a subscription, so it may not be the same for you, but you click on DNA on the top Ancestry menu and click on "traits". That takes you into the page that explains everything. This is assuming you have your DNA with Ancestry, and there is no extra cost.

-----Original Message-----
From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Rich Thayer
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 10:24 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: [SKCGS] Ancestry Traits

Has anybody signed up for Ancestry’s DNA Traits? I have had an invite, but have found nothing as to how to turn it on or buy that extra. Note that I have an account, BUT NOT a subscription.

Rich Thayer

Ancestry Traits

Rich Thayer
 

Has anybody signed up for Ancestry’s DNA Traits? I have had an invite, but have found nothing as to how to turn it on or buy that extra. Note that I have an account, BUT NOT a subscription.

Rich Thayer

Re: Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours

Michele Mattoon
 

You are keeping it going! You find the most interesting articles! 😄


On Jul 31, 2020, at 9:45 AM, Dorothy Pretare <dpgen@...> wrote:



So happy to see the sharing on my simple post, which I almost didn’t make because it might not be of interest to any members.

 

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Trish Sowards
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2020 10:50 AM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours

 

My story was just a historical and genealogical tidbit about family who lived nearby.

 

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 10:00 AM MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:

My story regarding Heart Mountain was simply the struggle of a man providing for his family.  In the fall of 1948 my father found work in Cody and moved us from Laurel, Montana.  We stayed in a small motel room for a couple of weeks while my father looked for somewhere for us to live.  I was six years old, in the first grade.  My sister was about 20 months old.

 

Housing was scarce and finally we found a building a few miles outside of town where we could live.  I remember that there were two long, narrow tarpaper laden buildings.  My mother wadded up rags and newspaper to stuff between the cracks in the interior boards.  Then we hung blankets on the interior walls to further insulate against the cold.  There was no electricity; we used a kerosene lantern.  I don't remember if the stove was for wood or coal but either would have been precious commodities.  And there was no running water.

 

The snow was so deep that my father had to walk down the hill breaking a trail for me to get to the school bus.  I dutifully had the mumps during Christmas break so I didn't miss any school.  And my father went hunting for rabbits or any other small game on that bleak hillside.  My six year old brain absorbed those images but I don't remember knowing the significance of the place at that time.

 

Fast forward what seemed a lifetime but was only six years to my eighth grade Wyoming History class and a picture of the barracks at Heart Mountain in my textbook.  I recognized the buildings in which we had lived for that few months during one of the coldest winters of my life.  My connection to the place is so minimal compared to its overall importance.  I am so happy to see the progress and support for the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center so that we may never forget.


From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Trish Sowards <trishseaward@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2020 9:20 AM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours

 

I was surprised to see Heart Mountain as well.  It was a few miles from my grandfather's farm.  My father said his father was the only person he ever heard say he didn't believe it was constitutional.  My father used to go to Heart Mountain when he was on leave from the Navy and play basketball with the young men who had to visit their families locked up there when they were on leave from the service.  Certainly a shameful episode in our history.  (I lived nearby from 1986 to 1981.  The chill factor actually got down to 80 below one winter.)

 

On Wed, Jul 29, 2020 at 9:45 PM Carol Larson via groups.io <Larsonjw=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

MaryLynn, there must have been an interesting story about your winter at Heart Mountain.  

This was an interesting list and none of my ancestors were ever at any of these.  Ellis Island yes, Chimney Rock on the Oregon Trail yes, Northern Neck Land Grants yes and lots of Oregon Land Donation Claims yes,  but no one ever connected with the tourist destinations we visit today.  Carol  



On Jul 29, 2020, at 8:07 PM, MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:



I was not too surprised to find one of the sites does indeed have a connection with my ancestors.  Stow, Massachusetts is named for John Stow, my original immigrant.

 

I was, however, very surprised to see Heart Mountain Interpretive Center listed.  When I was in first grade, my parents, my sister and I lived in one of those barracks from December 1948 through February 1949, a very cold winter.

 

MaryLynn


From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Dorothy Pretare <dpgen@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2020 7:33 PM
To: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours

 

Your ancestors may have a connection with one of the historic sites visited, and there is a short preview video for each that you can watch now.

 

America’s Summer Roadtrip

Saturday, August 1, 2020, and visit 12 Historic sites in 12 Hours. Free.

For more information and sign up:  https://www.americassummerroadtrip.org/

 

 

You Can Help Nazi Victims’ Families Learn Their Fates in Online Archive Project #volunteeropportunity

 

Just found via Twitter and Dick Eastman's blog:


Thousands answer crowdsourcing call to assist Germany’s Arolsen Archives in making 26 million newly digitized historical documents searchable by anyone online.
A huge crowdsourcing project to memorialize the victims of Nazi persecution is bringing together thousands of volunteers from across the globe who are locked down during the international coronavirus crisis. The “Every Name Counts” project, based out of Germany’s Arolsen Archives (formerly the International Tracing Service), aims to make 26 million recently digitized primary historical records searchable.

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her

Re: Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours

Dorothy Pretare
 

So happy to see the sharing on my simple post, which I almost didn’t make because it might not be of interest to any members.

 

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> On Behalf Of Trish Sowards
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2020 10:50 AM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours

 

My story was just a historical and genealogical tidbit about family who lived nearby.

 

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 10:00 AM MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:

My story regarding Heart Mountain was simply the struggle of a man providing for his family.  In the fall of 1948 my father found work in Cody and moved us from Laurel, Montana.  We stayed in a small motel room for a couple of weeks while my father looked for somewhere for us to live.  I was six years old, in the first grade.  My sister was about 20 months old.

 

Housing was scarce and finally we found a building a few miles outside of town where we could live.  I remember that there were two long, narrow tarpaper laden buildings.  My mother wadded up rags and newspaper to stuff between the cracks in the interior boards.  Then we hung blankets on the interior walls to further insulate against the cold.  There was no electricity; we used a kerosene lantern.  I don't remember if the stove was for wood or coal but either would have been precious commodities.  And there was no running water.

 

The snow was so deep that my father had to walk down the hill breaking a trail for me to get to the school bus.  I dutifully had the mumps during Christmas break so I didn't miss any school.  And my father went hunting for rabbits or any other small game on that bleak hillside.  My six year old brain absorbed those images but I don't remember knowing the significance of the place at that time.

 

Fast forward what seemed a lifetime but was only six years to my eighth grade Wyoming History class and a picture of the barracks at Heart Mountain in my textbook.  I recognized the buildings in which we had lived for that few months during one of the coldest winters of my life.  My connection to the place is so minimal compared to its overall importance.  I am so happy to see the progress and support for the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center so that we may never forget.


From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Trish Sowards <trishseaward@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2020 9:20 AM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours

 

I was surprised to see Heart Mountain as well.  It was a few miles from my grandfather's farm.  My father said his father was the only person he ever heard say he didn't believe it was constitutional.  My father used to go to Heart Mountain when he was on leave from the Navy and play basketball with the young men who had to visit their families locked up there when they were on leave from the service.  Certainly a shameful episode in our history.  (I lived nearby from 1986 to 1981.  The chill factor actually got down to 80 below one winter.)

 

On Wed, Jul 29, 2020 at 9:45 PM Carol Larson via groups.io <Larsonjw=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:

MaryLynn, there must have been an interesting story about your winter at Heart Mountain.  

This was an interesting list and none of my ancestors were ever at any of these.  Ellis Island yes, Chimney Rock on the Oregon Trail yes, Northern Neck Land Grants yes and lots of Oregon Land Donation Claims yes,  but no one ever connected with the tourist destinations we visit today.  Carol  



On Jul 29, 2020, at 8:07 PM, MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:



I was not too surprised to find one of the sites does indeed have a connection with my ancestors.  Stow, Massachusetts is named for John Stow, my original immigrant.

 

I was, however, very surprised to see Heart Mountain Interpretive Center listed.  When I was in first grade, my parents, my sister and I lived in one of those barracks from December 1948 through February 1949, a very cold winter.

 

MaryLynn


From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Dorothy Pretare <dpgen@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2020 7:33 PM
To: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours

 

Your ancestors may have a connection with one of the historic sites visited, and there is a short preview video for each that you can watch now.

 

America’s Summer Roadtrip

Saturday, August 1, 2020, and visit 12 Historic sites in 12 Hours. Free.

For more information and sign up:  https://www.americassummerroadtrip.org/

 

 

Re: Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours

rebecca dare
 

Oh whoops -- there's a good reason I can't get on the historic roadtrip. It's tomorrow, not today. Ahhhh -- can't keep track of the calendar anymore.

Rebecca

On Friday, July 31, 2020, 07:33:57 AM PDT, rebecca dare via groups.io <rdare2@...> wrote:


I can't get on to the Roadtrip, even though I signed up a few days ago. Can anyone help -- how can I see it?

Thanks, Rebecca

On Thursday, July 30, 2020, 10:49:42 AM PDT, Trish Sowards <trishseaward@...> wrote:


My story was just a historical and genealogical tidbit about family who lived nearby.

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 10:00 AM MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:
My story regarding Heart Mountain was simply the struggle of a man providing for his family.  In the fall of 1948 my father found work in Cody and moved us from Laurel, Montana.  We stayed in a small motel room for a couple of weeks while my father looked for somewhere for us to live.  I was six years old, in the first grade.  My sister was about 20 months old.

Housing was scarce and finally we found a building a few miles outside of town where we could live.  I remember that there were two long, narrow tarpaper laden buildings.  My mother wadded up rags and newspaper to stuff between the cracks in the interior boards.  Then we hung blankets on the interior walls to further insulate against the cold.  There was no electricity; we used a kerosene lantern.  I don't remember if the stove was for wood or coal but either would have been precious commodities.  And there was no running water.

The snow was so deep that my father had to walk down the hill breaking a trail for me to get to the school bus.  I dutifully had the mumps during Christmas break so I didn't miss any school.  And my father went hunting for rabbits or any other small game on that bleak hillside.  My six year old brain absorbed those images but I don't remember knowing the significance of the place at that time.

Fast forward what seemed a lifetime but was only six years to my eighth grade Wyoming History class and a picture of the barracks at Heart Mountain in my textbook.  I recognized the buildings in which we had lived for that few months during one of the coldest winters of my life.  My connection to the place is so minimal compared to its overall importance.  I am so happy to see the progress and support for the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center so that we may never forget.

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Trish Sowards <trishseaward@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2020 9:20 AM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours
 
I was surprised to see Heart Mountain as well.  It was a few miles from my grandfather's farm.  My father said his father was the only person he ever heard say he didn't believe it was constitutional.  My father used to go to Heart Mountain when he was on leave from the Navy and play basketball with the young men who had to visit their families locked up there when they were on leave from the service.  Certainly a shameful episode in our history.  (I lived nearby from 1986 to 1981.  The chill factor actually got down to 80 below one winter.)

On Wed, Jul 29, 2020 at 9:45 PM Carol Larson via groups.io <Larsonjw=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
MaryLynn, there must have been an interesting story about your winter at Heart Mountain.  
This was an interesting list and none of my ancestors were ever at any of these.  Ellis Island yes, Chimney Rock on the Oregon Trail yes, Northern Neck Land Grants yes and lots of Oregon Land Donation Claims yes,  but no one ever connected with the tourist destinations we visit today.  Carol  


On Jul 29, 2020, at 8:07 PM, MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:


I was not too surprised to find one of the sites does indeed have a connection with my ancestors.  Stow, Massachusetts is named for John Stow, my original immigrant.

I was, however, very surprised to see Heart Mountain Interpretive Center listed.  When I was in first grade, my parents, my sister and I lived in one of those barracks from December 1948 through February 1949, a very cold winter.

MaryLynn

From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Dorothy Pretare <dpgen@...>
Sent: Wednesday, July 29, 2020 7:33 PM
To: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] Visit 12 Historic sites in 12 hours
 

Your ancestors may have a connection with one of the historic sites visited, and there is a short preview video for each that you can watch now.

 

America’s Summer Roadtrip

Saturday, August 1, 2020, and visit 12 Historic sites in 12 Hours. Free.

For more information and sign up:  https://www.americassummerroadtrip.org/