Date   

[US Black Heritage] Researching Former Enslaved Ancestors event & new resource

 


Late notice, but I just read this. I've registered; the session begins at 3:30 PT according to Google Calendar. Also I never noticed that Genealogy Center link before. I believe that this is the Mid-Continent Library.

Valorie

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Amy Johnson Crow <amy@...>
Date: Wed, Mar 9, 2022 at 5:42 AM
Subject: [US Black Heritage] Researching Former Enslaved Ancestors event & new resource
To: <wikitrees-african-american-project@...>


Tomorrow (March 10) at 6:30pm Eastern, Renate Yarborough Sanders is presenting “Researching Formerly Enslaved Ancestors: It Takes a Village!” It will be over Zoom and is free to attend, but you need to register. Event sponsored by the Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library. Here’s the link with more info and registration:


Speaking of the Genealogy Center, I encourage everyone to check out their African American Gateway:


It’s a huge curated list of websites for African American research, as well as an extensive bibliography. It’s broken down by US states and regions; other countries; and subjects. I’ve added the link on the Resources Sandbox, but wanted everyone to be aware of it if you weren’t already. 

Amy


--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her


Roslyn Black Pioneers

 

My husband just sent me this. ❤

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Bob Zimmerman <bobofwa@...>
Date: Sun, Feb 13, 2022 at 2:28 PM
Subject: Roslyn Black Pioneers
To: Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...>


Thought you might be interested in this.

https://mtsgreenway.org/blog/roslyn-black-pioneers-part1/

 

 



--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



BlackProGen LIVE!: Episode 130 - The Exodusters

 

I know that many of our people are not exodusters, but this episode covers a lot of ground. Since the Black miners were recruited from the mid-West and not the Old South, much of what is discussed here is relevant to our research. Also, anything with Nicka Smith is fun!


Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



[SKCGS] All Over The Map: Hidden railroad artifact uncovered near Enumclaw?

 

For those who missed it: Locating Lost Old Coal Mines of King County is well worth reading, and we may need to ask Robin to lead us on some field trips soon, weather permitting!

PS: MaryLynn, perhaps she would consider either guest blogging for us, or allowing the use of some of her blog content and photos? 

Valorie

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: ROBIN ADAMS <D_RADAMS@...>
Date: Thu, Feb 10, 2022 at 6:05 PM
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] All Over The Map: Hidden railroad artifact uncovered near Enumclaw?
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>


My blog can be found at "Batgurrl.net".   Below is a link to my directory of all my coal mine seeking.  Cedar Mtn & New Black Diamond are a bit down the page.  Click on the links you are interested in.  

I have also several articles on the Ruins of Longacres that you all might like too.

This is a directory of blog links of my searches for Lost Coal Mines around the Seattle area. Hard to believe 100 years ago we had a booming mineral extraction business here. Now these old mines are buried and long forgotten. It all started with my fascination at Cougar Mountain Regional Park. This wonderful wilderness…



From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Carol Larson via groups.io <Larsonjw=aol.com@groups.io>
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2022 5:59 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [SKCGS] All Over The Map: Hidden railroad artifact uncovered near Enumclaw?
 
Thanks..please send me the link to your blog.  Thanks Carol Larson


On Feb 10, 2022, at 5:56 PM, ROBIN ADAMS <D_RADAMS@...> wrote:
Hi - that is me!!  Alan and I are still searching for the Logging Camp which was the first Veazie.  I love a good mystery around a ghost town.  This one is super tough.  I have gathered tons of maps and read 3 books on the area.  Now have a white paper consolidating that & photographed/video'd the railroad along the section we are searching.  Trying to scientifically keep track of what the guys find and what I have figured out.  That Powder House is just a little side line to the whole cause.

Will be publishing our findings once we get things sorted out.  

If you love these kinds of mysteries, I have written tons of articles about Cedar Mtn & the New Black Diamond Coal mines.  I am still searching the for a lost graveyard in that area too.

Let me know if anyone wants a link to my blog on that area.  


From: Society@SKCGS.groups.io <Society@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...>
Sent: Thursday, February 10, 2022 3:57 PM
To: Society@skcgs.groups.io <Society@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: [SKCGS] All Over The Map: Hidden railroad artifact uncovered near Enumclaw?
 
Fun article from MyNorthwest: All Over The Map: Hidden railroad artifact uncovered near Enumclaw?


Valorie
--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



BlackProGen LIVE!: Episode 130 - The Exodusters

 

I've not listened yet, but it surely sounds interesting!

BlackProGen LIVE!: Episode 130 - The Exodustershttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frnL8JR0Xyk

Valorie

--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



African American Family History Event February 5, 2022

 


I will not be able to attend because of a conflict with my BGRG meeting, which is very unfortunate. -v

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: mary anderson <msynergy007@...>
Date: Tue, Jan 25, 2022 at 7:59 AM
Subject: [Black-Heritage-Franklin] African American Family History Event February 5, 2022
To: <Black-Heritage-Franklin+owner@skcgs.groups.io>


Hi Friends-

We are getting close to our African American Family History Event - 2 years in the planning!

We are excited about what we will offer - but would like to offer a chance for your group to be involved if you would like to be -

We have room for an information table for your organization at our event should you wish to join us?  If so - let us know so we can put you on the Webpage and set up a table for you.

Here is the  webpage for our event - We will be both virtual and live and expect 150 people live and many more via zoom for our various speakers.
This event is an event leading up to Rootstech - having four Rootstech speakers and is aimed for those with African American heritage who are new to Family History and who are more experienced.  We have worked with various local churches within Tacoma and we have the Oral History Station coming from the Tacoma Library Northwest Room.  Your project would be a great fit!

Please let me know what you think.

Please pass on information about our Event to your group, to please.

Mary Anderson
Tacoma Family History Center Co-Director
253-223-1719  msynergy007@...




--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Re: GFO African-American Special Interest Group: Drowning You in Information

rebecca dare
 

That's quite a compilation! Thanks! I read the article "In the Shadow of the Lynching Memorial" and it took me right back to when my husband and I visited it and the museum in Montgomery a few years ago. It's a powerful experience to go there! 

On Tuesday, January 18, 2022, 01:45:24 PM PST, Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:


This is from the leader of the African-American Special Interest Group of the GFO. If you find any of them useful in our collective research, they can be added to a wiki page. I was doing more research into the FAN club of Ben Gaston, the fellow who was shot in Franklin, and testified in court. He was born in Chester, Randolph, Illinois. I was curious about the free Black population there, and in Illinois more widely. I found reference to an isolated settlement across the state, called Brushy Creek: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/jillistathistsoc.112.2.0129. Really fascinating.

Valorie

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Janice Sellers <janicemsj@...>
Date: Tue, Jan 18, 2022 at 12:44 AM
Subject: GFO African-American Special Interest Group: Drowning You in Information
To:


HI, everybody,

I decided to buckle down and catch up on all those links I've been collecting.  Unfortunately, several of the events have already passed, but I'm going to try to see if recordings of some talks are available online.  Considering how much info is in this message, I'll save them for next time.  This message is full of lots and lots of links to resources and information online, plus a few more events that I found (two coming up very shortly!).

Events

"The Kings and Rothschilds:  Working Together for Civil Rights"
Tuesday, January 18, 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/3216416518388/WN_ChkF-M94THe2UgzSFF_NAw

"The Legacy of Bruce's Beach" (California)
Wednesday, January 19, 5:30 p.m. Pacific Time

"The Ledger and the Chain:  How Domestic Slave Traders Shaped America"
Wednesday, January 26, 4:00 p.m. Pacific Time

"Into the Depths", National Geographic Podcast series on transatlantic slave trade
begins Thursdsay, January 27

"A Proud Heritage" (currently planned as in-person and virtual event)
Saturday, February 5, 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Pacific Time
Tacoma Family History Center, LDS Church, 1102 S. Pearl Street, Tacoma, Washington

"Clotilda:  Last American Slave Ship"
Monday, February 7, 10:00 p.m. Pacific Time/9:00 p.m. Central Time, National Geographic channel

"African American Genealogy in the Indian Territory and Oklahoma"
Thursday, February 10, 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time


Homesteaders

Mary Clark, a member of our group, submitted two homesteader ancestor stories for the National Park Service site.

Descendants of African American Homesteaders group

template for writing your ancestor's homestead story

Black Homesteaders in the Louisiana Florida parishes (recording)


Articles, Recordings, and More

free 2022 Black History calendar


"Ancient Ostrich Eggshell Beads Reveal 50,000-year-old Social Network across Africa"

"More Enslaved Africans Came to the Americas through This Port than Anywhere Else"
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/more-enslaved-africans-came-to-the-americas-through-this-port-than-anywhere-else-why-have-so-few-heard-of-it/ar-AASRdoI

trying to identify an enslaved child in a portrait of Yale

"Race and Slavery's Pandemic Legacies" (recording of presentation and list of sources)

best five sites for New England Black history

Michael Twitty talks about persimmon beer

the Clotilda is remarkably well preserved

Washington Post created database of all Congressmen who were slaveholders (and is apparently keeping it paywalled)

short film about USCT soldier Charles Sprout

Black soldiers in the 29th Connecticut during the Civil War

article about Freedmen's Bank records

"The Lessons of Reconstruction:  A Panel Discussion" (recording)

first Black woman to earn a commercial pilot's license in U.S, also taught future Tuskegee Airmen


digitally preserving Alabama's Rosenwald Schools

"Preserving Winsborough Hall at Stillman College" (Tuscaloosa, Alabama)

descendant of Baltimore "Afro-American" newspaper founder planning to digitize holdings

arts district preserves cultural memory of Black art and entertainment community in Baltimore

threatened Black cemetery in Cabin John, Maryland

judge stops sale of Montgomery County, Maryland apartment complex built over Freedmen's cemetery

records of enslaved Mississippians to be digitized

"St. Louis's Black Newspapers"

documenting historic Black cemeteries in New Jersey

historic Black cemetery probably beneath school in New Milford, New Jersey

"The Black Experience in Dutch New York" (recording)

one person's research on his 8th-great-grandmother in New York and Canada

photo archive of Harlem Black life goes to Metropolitan Museum of Art

Tompkins County (New York) Rural Black Residents Project

longest continuously published Black newspaper, still published in North Carolina, digitized and online

50,000 names added to Buncombe County, North Carolina slave deeds project

rebirth of Asheville, North Carolina hotel that hosted many big-name performers

researching the enslaved at and around the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

grave of 1898 Wilmington, North Carolina massacre victim found

Black Civil War vet and probably his grandchildren, Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania

vIrtual exhibit about history and role of Texas sharecropping

research on 19th-century remains found on Richmond's Virginia Commonwealth University campus

Confederate monuments removed in Richmond, Virginia going to Black History Museum

Black history of Greater Williamsburg area, VIrginia


Black Africans conscripted as labor during World War I

Bibliographic Database of African Scholarship on African Archaeology

stories of Black Canadian veterans

"Derailed:  The History of Black Railway Porters in Canada" online exhibition

Smithsonian plan to repatriate stolen Benin bronzes

"Black People of Poland"

"Addressing the Legacies of Slavery and Empire at National Trust for Scotland Properties" (recording)

manuscripts from an African king in Sierra Leone


comprehensive listing of historical Black newspapers, many digitized and online

research stories published about racial lynchings, built from digitized newspapers

National Museum of African American History and Culture launches "Searchable Museum"

Black photographer Gordon Parks

free library of rare books and art by Black creators

fIrst Black woman assigned to International Space Station

virtual Black doll museum

"Reconsidering Celebrations at Sites of Enslavement"

"In the Shadow of the Lynching Memorial"

interview with author of "How the Word Is Passed" (recommended by Jean Winborn during her presentation)

Ghanian man has built largest photo library in Africa

Black family home ownership in New York City (paywalled)

Descendants of the formerly enslaved at three plantations (paywalled)

I will write again soon about our upcoming March meeting.

Take care all,

Janice
Coordinator, GFO AA SIG

--
Everything turns out all right in the end. If it's not all right, it's not the end.


--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Re: GFO African-American Special Interest Group: Drowning You in Information

 

An even better general article about Blacks in Illinois is at https://www2.illinois.gov/dnrhistoric/Research/Pages/AfAmHist.aspx although the last half goes general. The first half will apply to any of our families from Illinois though.

Valorie

On Tue, Jan 18, 2022 at 1:45 PM Valorie Zimmerman via groups.io <valorie.zimmerman=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
This is from the leader of the African-American Special Interest Group of the GFO. If you find any of them useful in our collective research, they can be added to a wiki page. I was doing more research into the FAN club of Ben Gaston, the fellow who was shot in Franklin, and testified in court. He was born in Chester, Randolph, Illinois. I was curious about the free Black population there, and in Illinois more widely. I found reference to an isolated settlement across the state, called Brushy Creek: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/jillistathistsoc.112.2.0129. Really fascinating.

Valorie

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Janice Sellers <janicemsj@...>
Date: Tue, Jan 18, 2022 at 12:44 AM
Subject: GFO African-American Special Interest Group: Drowning You in Information
To:


HI, everybody,

I decided to buckle down and catch up on all those links I've been collecting.  Unfortunately, several of the events have already passed, but I'm going to try to see if recordings of some talks are available online.  Considering how much info is in this message, I'll save them for next time.  This message is full of lots and lots of links to resources and information online, plus a few more events that I found (two coming up very shortly!).

Events

"The Kings and Rothschilds:  Working Together for Civil Rights"
Tuesday, January 18, 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/3216416518388/WN_ChkF-M94THe2UgzSFF_NAw

"The Legacy of Bruce's Beach" (California)
Wednesday, January 19, 5:30 p.m. Pacific Time

"The Ledger and the Chain:  How Domestic Slave Traders Shaped America"
Wednesday, January 26, 4:00 p.m. Pacific Time

"Into the Depths", National Geographic Podcast series on transatlantic slave trade
begins Thursdsay, January 27

"A Proud Heritage" (currently planned as in-person and virtual event)
Saturday, February 5, 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Pacific Time
Tacoma Family History Center, LDS Church, 1102 S. Pearl Street, Tacoma, Washington

"Clotilda:  Last American Slave Ship"
Monday, February 7, 10:00 p.m. Pacific Time/9:00 p.m. Central Time, National Geographic channel

"African American Genealogy in the Indian Territory and Oklahoma"
Thursday, February 10, 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time


Homesteaders

Mary Clark, a member of our group, submitted two homesteader ancestor stories for the National Park Service site.

Descendants of African American Homesteaders group

template for writing your ancestor's homestead story

Black Homesteaders in the Louisiana Florida parishes (recording)


Articles, Recordings, and More

free 2022 Black History calendar


"Ancient Ostrich Eggshell Beads Reveal 50,000-year-old Social Network across Africa"

"More Enslaved Africans Came to the Americas through This Port than Anywhere Else"
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/more-enslaved-africans-came-to-the-americas-through-this-port-than-anywhere-else-why-have-so-few-heard-of-it/ar-AASRdoI

trying to identify an enslaved child in a portrait of Yale

"Race and Slavery's Pandemic Legacies" (recording of presentation and list of sources)

best five sites for New England Black history

Michael Twitty talks about persimmon beer

the Clotilda is remarkably well preserved

Washington Post created database of all Congressmen who were slaveholders (and is apparently keeping it paywalled)

short film about USCT soldier Charles Sprout

Black soldiers in the 29th Connecticut during the Civil War

article about Freedmen's Bank records

"The Lessons of Reconstruction:  A Panel Discussion" (recording)

first Black woman to earn a commercial pilot's license in U.S, also taught future Tuskegee Airmen


digitally preserving Alabama's Rosenwald Schools

"Preserving Winsborough Hall at Stillman College" (Tuscaloosa, Alabama)

descendant of Baltimore "Afro-American" newspaper founder planning to digitize holdings

arts district preserves cultural memory of Black art and entertainment community in Baltimore

threatened Black cemetery in Cabin John, Maryland

judge stops sale of Montgomery County, Maryland apartment complex built over Freedmen's cemetery

records of enslaved Mississippians to be digitized

"St. Louis's Black Newspapers"

documenting historic Black cemeteries in New Jersey

historic Black cemetery probably beneath school in New Milford, New Jersey

"The Black Experience in Dutch New York" (recording)

one person's research on his 8th-great-grandmother in New York and Canada

photo archive of Harlem Black life goes to Metropolitan Museum of Art

Tompkins County (New York) Rural Black Residents Project

longest continuously published Black newspaper, still published in North Carolina, digitized and online

50,000 names added to Buncombe County, North Carolina slave deeds project

rebirth of Asheville, North Carolina hotel that hosted many big-name performers

researching the enslaved at and around the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

grave of 1898 Wilmington, North Carolina massacre victim found

Black Civil War vet and probably his grandchildren, Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania

vIrtual exhibit about history and role of Texas sharecropping

research on 19th-century remains found on Richmond's Virginia Commonwealth University campus

Confederate monuments removed in Richmond, Virginia going to Black History Museum

Black history of Greater Williamsburg area, VIrginia


Black Africans conscripted as labor during World War I

Bibliographic Database of African Scholarship on African Archaeology

stories of Black Canadian veterans

"Derailed:  The History of Black Railway Porters in Canada" online exhibition

Smithsonian plan to repatriate stolen Benin bronzes

"Black People of Poland"

"Addressing the Legacies of Slavery and Empire at National Trust for Scotland Properties" (recording)

manuscripts from an African king in Sierra Leone


comprehensive listing of historical Black newspapers, many digitized and online

research stories published about racial lynchings, built from digitized newspapers

National Museum of African American History and Culture launches "Searchable Museum"

Black photographer Gordon Parks

free library of rare books and art by Black creators

fIrst Black woman assigned to International Space Station

virtual Black doll museum

"Reconsidering Celebrations at Sites of Enslavement"

"In the Shadow of the Lynching Memorial"

interview with author of "How the Word Is Passed" (recommended by Jean Winborn during her presentation)

Ghanian man has built largest photo library in Africa

Black family home ownership in New York City (paywalled)

Descendants of the formerly enslaved at three plantations (paywalled)

I will write again soon about our upcoming March meeting.

Take care all,

Janice
Coordinator, GFO AA SIG

--
Everything turns out all right in the end. If it's not all right, it's not the end.


--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her




--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



GFO African-American Special Interest Group: Drowning You in Information

 

This is from the leader of the African-American Special Interest Group of the GFO. If you find any of them useful in our collective research, they can be added to a wiki page. I was doing more research into the FAN club of Ben Gaston, the fellow who was shot in Franklin, and testified in court. He was born in Chester, Randolph, Illinois. I was curious about the free Black population there, and in Illinois more widely. I found reference to an isolated settlement across the state, called Brushy Creek: https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5406/jillistathistsoc.112.2.0129. Really fascinating.

Valorie

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Janice Sellers <janicemsj@...>
Date: Tue, Jan 18, 2022 at 12:44 AM
Subject: GFO African-American Special Interest Group: Drowning You in Information
To:


HI, everybody,

I decided to buckle down and catch up on all those links I've been collecting.  Unfortunately, several of the events have already passed, but I'm going to try to see if recordings of some talks are available online.  Considering how much info is in this message, I'll save them for next time.  This message is full of lots and lots of links to resources and information online, plus a few more events that I found (two coming up very shortly!).

Events

"The Kings and Rothschilds:  Working Together for Civil Rights"
Tuesday, January 18, 1:30 p.m. Pacific Time
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/3216416518388/WN_ChkF-M94THe2UgzSFF_NAw

"The Legacy of Bruce's Beach" (California)
Wednesday, January 19, 5:30 p.m. Pacific Time

"The Ledger and the Chain:  How Domestic Slave Traders Shaped America"
Wednesday, January 26, 4:00 p.m. Pacific Time

"Into the Depths", National Geographic Podcast series on transatlantic slave trade
begins Thursdsay, January 27

"A Proud Heritage" (currently planned as in-person and virtual event)
Saturday, February 5, 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Pacific Time
Tacoma Family History Center, LDS Church, 1102 S. Pearl Street, Tacoma, Washington

"Clotilda:  Last American Slave Ship"
Monday, February 7, 10:00 p.m. Pacific Time/9:00 p.m. Central Time, National Geographic channel

"African American Genealogy in the Indian Territory and Oklahoma"
Thursday, February 10, 10:00 a.m. Pacific Time


Homesteaders

Mary Clark, a member of our group, submitted two homesteader ancestor stories for the National Park Service site.

Descendants of African American Homesteaders group

template for writing your ancestor's homestead story

Black Homesteaders in the Louisiana Florida parishes (recording)


Articles, Recordings, and More

free 2022 Black History calendar


"Ancient Ostrich Eggshell Beads Reveal 50,000-year-old Social Network across Africa"

"More Enslaved Africans Came to the Americas through This Port than Anywhere Else"
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/more-enslaved-africans-came-to-the-americas-through-this-port-than-anywhere-else-why-have-so-few-heard-of-it/ar-AASRdoI

trying to identify an enslaved child in a portrait of Yale

"Race and Slavery's Pandemic Legacies" (recording of presentation and list of sources)

best five sites for New England Black history

Michael Twitty talks about persimmon beer

the Clotilda is remarkably well preserved

Washington Post created database of all Congressmen who were slaveholders (and is apparently keeping it paywalled)

short film about USCT soldier Charles Sprout

Black soldiers in the 29th Connecticut during the Civil War

article about Freedmen's Bank records

"The Lessons of Reconstruction:  A Panel Discussion" (recording)

first Black woman to earn a commercial pilot's license in U.S, also taught future Tuskegee Airmen


digitally preserving Alabama's Rosenwald Schools

"Preserving Winsborough Hall at Stillman College" (Tuscaloosa, Alabama)

descendant of Baltimore "Afro-American" newspaper founder planning to digitize holdings

arts district preserves cultural memory of Black art and entertainment community in Baltimore

threatened Black cemetery in Cabin John, Maryland

judge stops sale of Montgomery County, Maryland apartment complex built over Freedmen's cemetery

records of enslaved Mississippians to be digitized

"St. Louis's Black Newspapers"

documenting historic Black cemeteries in New Jersey

historic Black cemetery probably beneath school in New Milford, New Jersey

"The Black Experience in Dutch New York" (recording)

one person's research on his 8th-great-grandmother in New York and Canada

photo archive of Harlem Black life goes to Metropolitan Museum of Art

Tompkins County (New York) Rural Black Residents Project

longest continuously published Black newspaper, still published in North Carolina, digitized and online

50,000 names added to Buncombe County, North Carolina slave deeds project

rebirth of Asheville, North Carolina hotel that hosted many big-name performers

researching the enslaved at and around the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

grave of 1898 Wilmington, North Carolina massacre victim found

Black Civil War vet and probably his grandchildren, Mt. Pleasant, Pennsylvania

vIrtual exhibit about history and role of Texas sharecropping

research on 19th-century remains found on Richmond's Virginia Commonwealth University campus

Confederate monuments removed in Richmond, Virginia going to Black History Museum

Black history of Greater Williamsburg area, VIrginia


Black Africans conscripted as labor during World War I

Bibliographic Database of African Scholarship on African Archaeology

stories of Black Canadian veterans

"Derailed:  The History of Black Railway Porters in Canada" online exhibition

Smithsonian plan to repatriate stolen Benin bronzes

"Black People of Poland"

"Addressing the Legacies of Slavery and Empire at National Trust for Scotland Properties" (recording)

manuscripts from an African king in Sierra Leone


comprehensive listing of historical Black newspapers, many digitized and online

research stories published about racial lynchings, built from digitized newspapers

National Museum of African American History and Culture launches "Searchable Museum"

Black photographer Gordon Parks

free library of rare books and art by Black creators

fIrst Black woman assigned to International Space Station

virtual Black doll museum

"Reconsidering Celebrations at Sites of Enslavement"

"In the Shadow of the Lynching Memorial"

interview with author of "How the Word Is Passed" (recommended by Jean Winborn during her presentation)

Ghanian man has built largest photo library in Africa

Black family home ownership in New York City (paywalled)

Descendants of the formerly enslaved at three plantations (paywalled)

I will write again soon about our upcoming March meeting.

Take care all,

Janice
Coordinator, GFO AA SIG

--
Everything turns out all right in the end. If it's not all right, it's not the end.


--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Re: Spreadsheet - Franklin Miners and Link to Entries in Washington State Archives Death Register

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 

Great work, Melanie!

Regarding Joe Cassell/Cassel and Joe Mangiacak; I believe that this is one person with a surname of MangioCassells.  I can't verify it but I have found Italian immigrants decades later with that surname in various configurations--as one word, hyphenated or two words.

Also, the "gio" in Mangio sounds like "Joe" and could be the source of the first name.  None of this is proven, however.

David Jones, born in Wales appears in the territorial censuses with a wife Maggie.  I noticed that there is a 5 year old Elmer Jones, son of David Jones, who died at Franklin in June 1894.  That poor family!

MaryLynn


From: Black-Heritage-Franklin@SKCGS.groups.io <Black-Heritage-Franklin@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Melanie Hinds <hindsgenealogy@...>
Sent: Friday, October 29, 2021 1:40 PM
To: Black-Heritage-Franklin@SKCGS.groups.io <Black-Heritage-Franklin@SKCGS.groups.io>
Subject: [Black-Heritage-Franklin] Spreadsheet - Franklin Miners and Link to Entries in Washington State Archives Death Register
 
Hello!
Attached is a spreadsheet I got from MaryLynn which has all the miners that died in the Franklin disaster with some information I added which I hope will be useful. In addition to the spreadsheet from MaryLynn I incorporated information regarding the miners' race/ethnicity, marital status, family information, and burial location, as found in the Sep 1, 1894 issue of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

A few things to point out for the spreadsheet:

(1) for the most part, my additions are in CAPS to distinguish it from what was in the database sheet provided by ML.

(2) where it appeared that there might be two spellings for a name I have included both. I suspect our research will uncover the correct version. 

(3) The first row should be "frozen" meaning that as you scroll through this list (which is alphabetized by last name) the headings for each column should remain at the top so you don't have to scroll up and done to figure out what information you see in each cell. (Though it's probably pretty evident what information is in a cell it's a habit I have when I work with spreadsheets.)

(4) The last 2 columns contain the page number & the record number for each miner's entry in the archives death register so that you can easily find it and not have to decipher handwriting. Let me know if you find any errors.

(5) There are 3 names that are highlighted: Joe CASSEL/CASSELL;  David D. JONES and Joe MANGIACAK. Both Cassel & Jones are listed in the PI news article, but I was not able to find them in the State Archives database and Mangiacak is in the archives database but his name does not appear in the PI article.  

Please let me know if you have any questions, and let me know if you find any errors.

Melanie


Re: Theron B Corey retires

Melanie Hinds
 

Thank you!

On Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 3:26 PM MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:


Re: Company Coal Town story in 1994 "Columbia" Magazine

 

NICE! What a great find, Melanie. I've not read Columbia for a good long while and should fix that!

Valorie

On Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 8:50 AM Melanie Hinds <hindsgenealogy@...> wrote:
Found this magazine issued in 1994 by the Washington State Historical Society which has an article on the Franklin mine. It mentions Theron B. Corey (who I am researching) but it might also be of interest to others. Story starts on page 13.

Melanie



--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Spreadsheet - Franklin Miners and Link to Entries in Washington State Archives Death Register

Melanie Hinds
 

Hello!
Attached is a spreadsheet I got from MaryLynn which has all the miners that died in the Franklin disaster with some information I added which I hope will be useful. In addition to the spreadsheet from MaryLynn I incorporated information regarding the miners' race/ethnicity, marital status, family information, and burial location, as found in the Sep 1, 1894 issue of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

A few things to point out for the spreadsheet:

(1) for the most part, my additions are in CAPS to distinguish it from what was in the database sheet provided by ML.

(2) where it appeared that there might be two spellings for a name I have included both. I suspect our research will uncover the correct version. 

(3) The first row should be "frozen" meaning that as you scroll through this list (which is alphabetized by last name) the headings for each column should remain at the top so you don't have to scroll up and done to figure out what information you see in each cell. (Though it's probably pretty evident what information is in a cell it's a habit I have when I work with spreadsheets.)

(4) The last 2 columns contain the page number & the record number for each miner's entry in the archives death register so that you can easily find it and not have to decipher handwriting. Let me know if you find any errors.

(5) There are 3 names that are highlighted: Joe CASSEL/CASSELL;  David D. JONES and Joe MANGIACAK. Both Cassel & Jones are listed in the PI news article, but I was not able to find them in the State Archives database and Mangiacak is in the archives database but his name does not appear in the PI article.  

Please let me know if you have any questions, and let me know if you find any errors.

Melanie


Theron B Corey retires

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 


Re: Franklin gossip

 

Yes, Ancestry & MyHeritage make it difficult to add an unconnected (so far) person. We decided it was worth the trouble because some of them may connect at some point anyway. 


On Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 8:10 AM Melanie Hinds <hindsgenealogy@...> wrote:
I want to take a step back and just confirm something: the way we are adding these "unrelated" people to the Ancestry tree, since these miners (for the most part) were not related to each other (there may be a few exceptions).


I was planning to follow this method to add Theron B. Corey to the tree.

Melanie

On Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 1:48 AM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:
We can't safely share a link to the spreadsheet here in the group that allows editing, but it should be OK to allow viewing. Those who are members of the group here can be invited as editors, at least those who are confident with spreadsheets. As for the articles, we can each upload those to the profile of the person in the tree, and take care to link it to the others mentioned who are already in the tree as well. I suggest transcribing each article to make it easier. By the way, Chronicling America has the OCR text -- starting with that can sometimes make the transcription faster. We can add comments mentioning those mentioned who are not yet in the tree. CA has pretty good citations premade for us as well I think!

Valorie

On Thu, Oct 28, 2021 at 9:37 PM MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:
I have got to get this spreadsheet available to others in this group.  I spent the afternoon browsing through the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper from 1892 - 1900 just using "Franklin mines" for searching.  I caught up on lots of gossip and some murders and trials of the suspects.  I followed the trials and tribulations of miners' wives who sued for damages after the 1894 fire. And I found some articles such as the one attached here.

Because I have worked on the spreadsheet for a few weeks, I recognize names in the articles.  And those names are starting to have personality.  As we add people to the trees, we can attach the newspaper articles too.

Somebody please figure out how to have the spreadsheet and articles available for each other!  This is TOO MUCH FUN!

MaryLynn


Re: Franklin gossip

MARYLYNN STRICKLAND
 

Melanie, I looked at Ancestry and your addition of Theron B. Corey--Well Done!  thank you so much for adding this man who was instrumental in bringing the Black miners to Franklin in the first place.


From: Black-Heritage-Franklin@SKCGS.groups.io <Black-Heritage-Franklin@SKCGS.groups.io> on behalf of Melanie Hinds <hindsgenealogy@...>
Sent: Friday, October 29, 2021 8:10 AM
To: Black-Heritage-Franklin@skcgs.groups.io <Black-Heritage-Franklin@skcgs.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Black-Heritage-Franklin] Franklin gossip
 
I want to take a step back and just confirm something: the way we are adding these "unrelated" people to the Ancestry tree, since these miners (for the most part) were not related to each other (there may be a few exceptions).


I was planning to follow this method to add Theron B. Corey to the tree.

Melanie

On Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 1:48 AM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:
We can't safely share a link to the spreadsheet here in the group that allows editing, but it should be OK to allow viewing. Those who are members of the group here can be invited as editors, at least those who are confident with spreadsheets. As for the articles, we can each upload those to the profile of the person in the tree, and take care to link it to the others mentioned who are already in the tree as well. I suggest transcribing each article to make it easier. By the way, Chronicling America has the OCR text -- starting with that can sometimes make the transcription faster. We can add comments mentioning those mentioned who are not yet in the tree. CA has pretty good citations premade for us as well I think!

Valorie

On Thu, Oct 28, 2021 at 9:37 PM MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:
I have got to get this spreadsheet available to others in this group.  I spent the afternoon browsing through the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper from 1892 - 1900 just using "Franklin mines" for searching.  I caught up on lots of gossip and some murders and trials of the suspects.  I followed the trials and tribulations of miners' wives who sued for damages after the 1894 fire. And I found some articles such as the one attached here.

Because I have worked on the spreadsheet for a few weeks, I recognize names in the articles.  And those names are starting to have personality.  As we add people to the trees, we can attach the newspaper articles too.

Somebody please figure out how to have the spreadsheet and articles available for each other!  This is TOO MUCH FUN!

MaryLynn




--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Company Coal Town story in 1994 "Columbia" Magazine

Melanie Hinds
 

Found this magazine issued in 1994 by the Washington State Historical Society which has an article on the Franklin mine. It mentions Theron B. Corey (who I am researching) but it might also be of interest to others. Story starts on page 13.

Melanie


Re: Franklin gossip

Melanie Hinds
 

I want to take a step back and just confirm something: the way we are adding these "unrelated" people to the Ancestry tree, since these miners (for the most part) were not related to each other (there may be a few exceptions).


I was planning to follow this method to add Theron B. Corey to the tree.

Melanie

On Fri, Oct 29, 2021 at 1:48 AM Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:
We can't safely share a link to the spreadsheet here in the group that allows editing, but it should be OK to allow viewing. Those who are members of the group here can be invited as editors, at least those who are confident with spreadsheets. As for the articles, we can each upload those to the profile of the person in the tree, and take care to link it to the others mentioned who are already in the tree as well. I suggest transcribing each article to make it easier. By the way, Chronicling America has the OCR text -- starting with that can sometimes make the transcription faster. We can add comments mentioning those mentioned who are not yet in the tree. CA has pretty good citations premade for us as well I think!

Valorie

On Thu, Oct 28, 2021 at 9:37 PM MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:
I have got to get this spreadsheet available to others in this group.  I spent the afternoon browsing through the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper from 1892 - 1900 just using "Franklin mines" for searching.  I caught up on lots of gossip and some murders and trials of the suspects.  I followed the trials and tribulations of miners' wives who sued for damages after the 1894 fire. And I found some articles such as the one attached here.

Because I have worked on the spreadsheet for a few weeks, I recognize names in the articles.  And those names are starting to have personality.  As we add people to the trees, we can attach the newspaper articles too.

Somebody please figure out how to have the spreadsheet and articles available for each other!  This is TOO MUCH FUN!

MaryLynn




--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Re: [SKCGS] [DM] [SKCGS] George Moore Green

 

Hi Rebecca, it's all part of the context! There were not lots of interracial marriages back then, but they did happen. And to me, one of the wonderful parts of the Franklin story is how the strike-breakers ended up working alongside the strikers; Blacks and Whites working together and becoming union brothers.

Valorie

On Thu, Oct 28, 2021 at 5:20 PM Rebecca and Bill <rdare2@...> wrote:
I didn't know if the group would be interested as he's a white miner. But happy to share! and would welcome any new information anyone comes up with! Thanks, Rebecca

On Thursday, October 28, 2021, 03:32:57 PM PDT, Valorie Zimmerman <valorie.zimmerman@...> wrote:


Hi Rebecca, you sent this post to the owner address. Can you please resend to Black-Heritage-Franklin@SKCGS.groups.io so the group can see?

Valorie

On Wed, Oct 27, 2021 at 1:32 PM rebecca dare via groups.io <rdare2=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Melanie - thanks for getting back to me. Yes, that is my great grandfather's FS number. My family tree on Ancestry.com is 1 REBECCA DARE if you have any desire to see it. 

I too am getting more and more interested in mining history -- never thought I would. I think George started working in mines in England when he was 12 or so. I've only been doing much genealogy for the last 3 years or so. And my tree is definitely a work in progress!

We had a great time in Illinois - in fact, we were happy to get to Illinois after most of the states we'd driven through so far didn't seem to think there was a pandemic going on! We enjoyed seeing Streator and also went to Bishop Hill. Have you been there? What town are you in?

In Streator we searched for the grave of George Moore Green's first wife, Mary Bruce, and an infant. But the graveyard was in the middle of a cornfield so I guess you can't see it until the corn is cut! I'm a descendent of his second wife, Achsah Blanchard. 

We also visited a DNA cousin (who descended from GMG and his first wife) in Red Lodge, Montana. She gave me a photo of Red Lodge in its heavy mining days. Mines all over the place!

I do hope to work on the black miners here as well as expand my information about the Greens who moved to Roslyn, WA. Wish I'd started genealogy years and years ago!

Rebecca



On Wednesday, October 27, 2021, 11:51:48 AM PDT, <society+owner@skcgs.groups.io> wrote:


Rebecca,

It was nice chatting with you this past Monday during the SKCGS call regarding your ancestor George Moore Green. I went to Family Seach and found who I assume is your ancestor: K6QD-2CJ . How interesting that he was recruited from Illinois to go to Washington and work there. I'm finding all this talk and research about mining in Washington, and the use of black miners, very interesting, as it's not something that is part of my family history, nor my husband's. 

I live about 90 minutes from Streator so while it is not right next door, I am certainly closer to it than you are. :)

Melanie


--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her




--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her



Re: Franklin gossip

 

We can't safely share a link to the spreadsheet here in the group that allows editing, but it should be OK to allow viewing. Those who are members of the group here can be invited as editors, at least those who are confident with spreadsheets. As for the articles, we can each upload those to the profile of the person in the tree, and take care to link it to the others mentioned who are already in the tree as well. I suggest transcribing each article to make it easier. By the way, Chronicling America has the OCR text -- starting with that can sometimes make the transcription faster. We can add comments mentioning those mentioned who are not yet in the tree. CA has pretty good citations premade for us as well I think!

Valorie

On Thu, Oct 28, 2021 at 9:37 PM MARYLYNN STRICKLAND <mlstrick2@...> wrote:
I have got to get this spreadsheet available to others in this group.  I spent the afternoon browsing through the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper from 1892 - 1900 just using "Franklin mines" for searching.  I caught up on lots of gossip and some murders and trials of the suspects.  I followed the trials and tribulations of miners' wives who sued for damages after the 1894 fire. And I found some articles such as the one attached here.

Because I have worked on the spreadsheet for a few weeks, I recognize names in the articles.  And those names are starting to have personality.  As we add people to the trees, we can attach the newspaper articles too.

Somebody please figure out how to have the spreadsheet and articles available for each other!  This is TOO MUCH FUN!

MaryLynn




--
http://about.me/valoriez - pronouns: she/her


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